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Corrected handling of DST icon in Explorer. Wishes and feature requests Optionally have a spread sheet view or grid to edit the values in. To manually rearrange the sheets or subsets and view categories. Rename categories. Support to manipulate the.

The ability to move sheet views from one sheet to another, while maintaining linked callouts. Change case. Workaround is to export to Excel, change case and import Spell check. Workaround is to export to Excel, spell check and import Delete selected sheets or subset including sheets. Tool to help migrate data from old title blocks with normal attributes to attributes with fields connected to the sheet set.

Create a new sheet set from scratch based on data in an Excel file or the like with either using existing drawings or creating new ones. To sort properties in a custom order. Saved settings in a separate file saved in same folder as the DST.

Create subsets. Duplicate existing subset. Ability to remove multiple subsets at once or even deleting a subset and all the sheets associated with it. Having to delete multiple sheets is at once is excellent but would like to do the same with subsets. Edit subset properties. Edit subset custom properties. Add alphabetic indexing as an option to Sheet Indexing.

Rename subsets within the application. Rename renumber Sheet views. Support for cloud storage like Autodesk BIM License agreement. License agreement The license agreement is found here. Thanks for the great list! What about layer style formats? Like SLD for instance. ADF, however like shapes and filegdb there is more than one file on disk for a single raster. CPG describe the encoding applied to create the shapefile.

Where are MapInfo file formats? Since when is Postgis a file format? Thanks for the overview but I want to correct two points. Your email address will not be published. Skip to content. Some geospatial data formats are common. But some are not so common. First, take a look at these 63 formats in GIS. Then, bookmark it for future reference:. Subscribe to our newsletter:.

I would love it if you added the following file formats:. Thank you! Leave a Reply Your email address will not be published. Toggle Menu Close. Search for: Search. All commercial and open source accept shapefile as a GIS format. The three required files are: SHP is the feature geometry. SHX is the shape index position. DBF is the attribute data.

You can optionally include these files but are not completely necessary. PRJ is the projection system metadata. XML is the associated metadata. SBN is the spatial index for optimizing queries. SBX optimizes loading times. Similar to shapefiles, they require a set of files to represent geographic information and attributes. ID files are index files that link graphical objects to database information.

MAP files are the map objects that store geographic information. IND files are index files for the tabular data. AUX auxiliary files store projections and other information. OVR pyramid files improves performance for raster display. Whereas Band interleaved by pixel BIP assigns pixel values for each band by rows. Finally, Band sequential format BSQ stores separate bands by rows. They generally contain elements such as edges, curves, and annotation text in layers.

Every element plots XY points in a grid. DGN files consist of layers including annotation, points, polylines, polygons, and multipath. They also contain style information ColorIndex and a spatial reference system. Record A stores general characteristics of the DEM such as descriptive name, elevation minimum and maximum, extent boundaries and number of B records.

Record B contains a header and elevation profile. Some reasons for using multiple meshes include:. Meshes can overlap, abut, or not touch at all. In the last case, essentially two separate calculations are performed with no communication at all between them. Obstructions and vents are entered in terms of the overall coordinate system and need not apply to any one particular mesh.

Each mesh checks the coordinates of all the geometric entities and decides whether or not they are to be included.

To simplify working with multiple meshes, PyroSim provides the following additional mesh operations:. To use any of the above actions, select one or more meshes, right-click to open a popup menu, then click the desired mesh action. To simulate a surface made of heat-conducting solids or a fuel you must specify a material that describes certain thermal properties and pyrolysis behavior. PyroSim offers two categories of materials: solid materials and liquid fuels.

To create a new material, you can use the Edit Materials dialog. On the Model menu, click Edit Materials. Examples of solid materials include brick, gypsum board, and upholstery. To create a solid material:. After following these steps, a default solid material will be created. Text entered in the Description box will not affect the simulation, but will be preserved in the FDS input file using the FYI field of the material.

Including a description of the material is recommended. The Pyrolysis tab provides options to set the heat of combustion and add reactions that will be used to govern how the material burns. Each material can have a maximum of 10 reactions. To add a reaction, click the Add button.

This will open a dialog to edit the new reaction. It provides the following options:. The thermal properties tab for liquid fuels is identical to the thermal properties tab for solid fuels, see Section 6. Surfaces are used to define the properties of solid objects and vents in your FDS model. The surface can use previously defined materials in mixtures or layers. By default, all solid objects and vents are inert, with a temperature that is fixed at the ambient temperature set in the Simulation Parameters dialog.

In addition to defining heat conduction in a solid, surfaces can also be used to define a burner, specify the ignition temperature for an object, give a vent a supply velocity, and set the many other properties supported by FDS. To create, modify, and delete surfaces, you can use the Edit Surfaces dialog.

The dialog in Figure 35 shows the dialog being used to edit an upholstery surface. These surfaces cannot be changed and are present in every analysis. This surface remains fixed at the ambient temperature. This surface is used only for vents on the exterior mesh boundary. It is intended to be applied to an entire mesh boundary to symmetrically double the size of the domain. PyroSim aids the user by organizing the surface options into logical types, such as a burner to define a simple fire or a layered surface to represent a solid, heat conducting wall.

The Edit Surfaces dialog helps define a surface type with a set of tabs. Each tab provides a collection of input fields and settings for the user to customize that surface type.

Air leak surfaces can be used to create a permeable barrier between two pressure zones, defined by the Leak Path in the Edit Surfaces dialog. The leak area is defined by the zones selected. It allows you to customize the description, color, and texture of the inert surface described in Reserved Surfaces.

Exhaust surfaces can be used to remove gas from the simulation domain. The specification of their air movement parameters is identical to that of a supply surface, but instead of the velocity or flux driving air into the domain, they are pulling air out.

Exhaust surfaces do not have the option to apply injection or geometry properties. Tabs: Advanced , Air Flow , Thermal. The General Surface type is a hybrid between the Burner and Supply surface types.

Adding a little more flexibility than either of them individually. This surface type represents a radiative heat source. The options are identical to the options for a burner without the heat release options. If the surface temperature is less than the ambient temperature, the surface will remove heat from the surrounding gases.

Layered surfaces are composed of one or more material definitions. Materials include solid and liquid substances such as concrete, pine, and ethanol. For more information about materials and how they can be specified in PyroSim, please refer to Chapter 6.

This type of surface is ideal for walls and other objects that are composed of real-world materials. This surface type can also be used to inject extra non-reactive species into the simulation. This surface represents a vent that injects air into the simulation domain. The temperature of the air injected by supply vents can be controlled using settings on the thermal tab. Species Injection options are available if the Specify Mass Flux of Individual Species option in the Air Flow group is selected and there are extra, non-reactive species present in the simulation.

Each tab of the Edit Surfaces dialog provides a set of inputs and settings that can be used to build a custom surface type as listed in Section 7. The following sections describe the parameters on each tab and are listed in alphabetical order, not the order they might appear for a surface type. The reaction used to model a given surface can either be taken from the material specifications, or given explicitly by the surface. Manually specifying the parameters will produce a surface similar to a burner.

You can inject extra non-reactive species into the simulation using the species injection options. To use these options, you must first specify species using the Edit Species dialog. You can add textures to surfaces to increase the realism of your model. This can be done through the use of Appearance objects. An Appearance defines how the surfaces of objects will appear and can have colors or textures applied to them.

Some default appearances are provided or you can import your own. The Room Fire example demonstrates using a wood texture for a pine floor and hanging a picture on a wall. Your textures will be automatically displayed in PyroSim. Appearances will be shown on obstructions and vents when the View Mode is either Realistic or Realistic with Outlines. Appearances can also be viewed by going to the Model menu and selecting Edit Appearances. Geometry can either be created through dialogs or by using the drafting tools in the 2D or 3D views as discussed in Chapter 9.

The user can also organize the model by creating floors and groups. In addition, the user can assign background images to floors to aid in drafting.

Obstructions are the fundamental geometric representation in FDS. In FDS, obstructions are rectangular, axis-aligned solids defined by two points. Surface properties are assigned to each face of the obstruction. In PyroSim, obstructions can take any shape, have any number of faces, and have different surfaces applied to each face.

At the time of simulation, PyroSim will automatically convert the obstructions to axis-aligned blocks required by FDS as discussed in Section To create a new obstruction, either use an obstruction drawing tool as discussed in Chapter 9 or on the Model menu, click New Obstruction. This tab of the obstruction panel presents all options other than those controlling geometry and surface information. This includes activation events conditions that can cause the obstruction to be added or removed from the simulation and miscellaneous options such as color and smoothing.

This tab allows you to enter the min and max coordinates of the object. For more elaborate geometry, such as slabs, this tab may contain a table of points and extrusion options.

Extrusion is the mechanism PyroSim uses to extend 2-dimensional objects along a vector – creating a 3-dimensional object. The Surfaces tab can be used to specify one surface to be used for all six sides of the object or assign surfaces on a per-face basis. Alternately, surfaces can be “painted” using the Paint Tool as discussed in Section 9.

Holes are used to carve negative spaces out of obstructions. In FDS, holes are similar to obstructions in that they are defined as axis-aligned blocks. Like obstructions in PyroSim, however, holes can be any shape.

PyroSim automatically converts them to blocks in the FDS input file. PyroSim treats holes as first-class objects that can be selected, deleted, and have other operations performed on them like obstructions as discussed in Chapter In the 3D and 2D views, holes appear as transparent objects.

In addition, for display purposes only, PyroSim carves holes out of obstructions as shown in Figure For complex holes or obstructions or large holes that span many obstructions, this process may be slow.

In these cases, hole-cutting display can be turned off by going to the View menu and deselecting Cut Holes From Obstructions. By default, all obstructions allow holes to be cut from them. To prevent an obstruction from allowing holes, edit the properties of the obstruction as discussed in Section 8.

There are various rules that govern how holes are written to the FDS input file. In general, if the PYROGEOM file is enabled, a hole has control logic, and the hole intersects obstructions, the hole will be pre-subtracted from obstructions before the obstructions are converted into blocks, and the holes will be excluded from the FDS file. If the above conditions do not hold, the holes are converted to blocks similarly to obstructions and are written as HOLE records.

For more information, see Section Holes can either be drawn as discussed in Chapter 9 or can be created by opening the Model menu and clicking New Hole. Like obstructions, holes can also be activated as discussed in Chapter Holes can also have a color applied.

When starting a simulation or exporting an FDS file for some models, the user may receive the following message as shown in Figure 42 : “PyroSim has detected a hole touching a mesh boundary, which may cause cutting problems in FDS.

Would you like to slightly expand these types of holes? FDS currently has an issue where it will not fully cut a hole from an obstruction if both the hole and obstruction touch a mesh boundary at the same location. Instead, FDS leaves a thin obstruction along the mesh boundary. Figure 43 shows a model in PyroSim that can lead this problem.

In this model, both the hole and the obstruction touch the bottom of the mesh, and the hole should cut all the way through the mesh.

Figure 44 shows this model in FDS where the hole has not been punched all the way through the obstruction. PyroSim detects potential cases where this might happen and prompts the user with the Expand Boundary Holes dialog. This ensures the hole is properly cut all the way through the obstruction as shown in Figure If the user chooses not to expand these types of holes the No option , the hole will be written exactly as specified and may lead to the thin obstruction problem.

Vents have general usage in FDS to describe a 2D rectangular patch on the surface of a solid obstruction or on a mesh boundary as shown in Figure A vent may have a different surface applied to it than the rest of the obstruction to which it is attached. Taken literally, a vent can be used to model components of the ventilation system in a building, like a diffuser or a return. In these cases, the vent coordinates form a plane on a solid surface forming the boundary of the duct.

No holes need to be created through the solid; it is assumed that air is pushed out of or sucked into duct work within the wall. You can also use vents as a means of applying a particular boundary condition to a rectangular patch on a solid surface. A fire, for example, is usually created by first generating a solid obstruction and then specifying a vent somewhere on one of the faces of the solid with the characteristics of the thermal and combustion properties of the fuel.

For more information on these types, see Chapter 7. Vents can either be drawn as discussed in Chapter 9 or be created by opening the Model menu and clicking New Vent.

This will open the New Vent dialog as shown in Figure With the exception of Fire Spread , the other properties are similar to obstructions. Fire Spread can be specified on vents using a burner surface Chapter 7. This option simulates a radially spreading fire at the vent. A vent can also be given radial properties. Groups can be used to hierarchically organize the model. Groups can only be seen in the Navigation View. The “Model” is the base group.

Users can nest groups inside other groups, allowing the user to work with thousands of objects in an organized way. When the user performs an action on a group, that action will be propagated to all objects in the group. Both of these actions will show the Create Group dialog as shown in Figure This dialog allows the user to choose the parent group and name of the new group.

In the Change Group dialog shown in Figure 52 , select the desired group. If a new group is desired, select New Subgroup and specify a name. If this is chosen, a new group will be created under the specified existing group, and the selected objects will be moved to this new group. All newly drawn objects will be added to this group.

Floors are used in PyroSim to quickly apply clipping filters to the scene to only show a portion of the model. They are also used to initialize the properties of drawing tools so that they draw at the proper Z location. An example of floor clipping is shown in Floor clipping , where Figure 54 shows all floors and Figure 55 shows a single floor.

This will display the Manage Floors dialog shown in Figure To add a new floor, click the Add Floor. This will show the New Floor dialog shown in Figure In this dialog, if the user enters a new slab thickness , the elevation will be automatically updated so the new floor does not overlap the others unless the user enters a specific value for the elevation. In addition, unless the user enters a specific name, a name will be automatically generated based on the elevation. Press OK again in the Manage Floors dialog to commit the changes.

By default, the model contains one floor at elevation 0. Using these values leaves a distance of 3. Once the floors have been defined, the user can filter the display to show either a single floor or all floors as shown in Figure 7.

For most views, the Z clipping range for a particular floor is from the floor elevation minus slab thickness to floor elevation plus wall height. The Z clipping range works differently for the top camera of the 2D view, however. In this view, the clipping is from the elevation of the floor BELOW to the elevation plus wall height of the current floor.

This allows the geometry on the floor below to be snapped to in drawing geometry for the current floor. For this to be useful, however, the user may want to use wireframe rendering.

Each floor can have an associated background image. To add a background image to a floor, go to the 2D or 3D View, select a specific floor, then click the Configure Background Image button.

Alternately click the Define Floor Locations button, , and then in the Background Image column, select the Edit button. This will display the Configure Background Image dialog shown in Figure Now, in the 3D or 2D views, when the user displays a specific floor, the background image for that floor will be displayed.

To turn off the background images, go to the 2D or 3D View, and click the Show Background Images button next to the floors drop-down. While not a full-fledged drafting application, PyroSim does provide useful drawing features, including the following:. PyroSim provides several drawing and editing tools. These tools are located on the drawing toolbar at the left side of the 3D and 2D Views as shown in Figure Some of these tools allow a user to create and edit objects such as slabs and walls that are not constrained to the FDS mesh.

In these cases, PyroSim will automatically convert the shapes to mesh-based blocks when the FDS input file is created. For information on block conversion, see Section To begin drawing or editing with a tool, the user can single-click the tool from the tool bar. The button will show a green dot when pinned. Every time the same tool button is clicked, the pinned state of that tool will be toggled, so clicking the button again after pinning will disable pinning. This will also cancel pinning and will revert back to the last-used navigation tool.

Each tool has a set of properties that can be modified by clicking the Tool Properties button located at the bottom of the toolbar after selecting the desired tool. Options such as elevation, height, surface, and color can all be edited in the Tool Properties dialog. In addition to the tool properties, each tool also has additional quick actions.

To show these actions, start the desired tool and then right-click in the 2D or 3D View. This opens a context menu with the quick actions. Figure 60 shows an example of the quick action menu for the wall tool. This menu allows the user to perform actions specific to the tool, such as closing a polygon, picking a surface, setting wall alignment, accessing the tool properties, etc. Snapping is one way to precisely draw and edit objects. It is the process of finding some element in the scene, such as a vertex or edge close to the cursor, and snapping the cursor to that element like a magnet.

In PyroSim, snapping can be performed against the solution meshes, objects in the model, and orthographic constraints. The 2D View additionally provides a sketch grid and polar angle constraints. If a snap point is found, an indicator dot shown in Figure 61 will appear at the snap point. By default, snapping is enabled. If there are any solution meshes in the model see Chapter 5 , PyroSim can snap to them during drawing and editing. For each mesh that is visible, PyroSim can snap to its boundary edges, boundary faces, grid lines, and the intersections of the grid lines, depending on which mesh display filters are active as discussed in Section 2.

PyroSim also provides a user-defined drawing grid, or sketch grid, in the 2D View as shown in Figure When a new model is created, the sketch grid is visible and can be snapped to in the 2D view. The default spacing for the divisions is 1 m, but can be changed by going to the View menu and clicking Set Sketch Grid Spacing. Once the user has created a solution mesh, PyroSim will automatically switch to solution mesh snapping and disable sketch grid snapping.

In the 2D View , PyroSim will only snap to the sketch grid or visible solution meshes. To disable grid snapping altogether, on the View menu choose Disable Grid Snapping. There are three basic categories of geometry that can be snapped to on objects: faces , edges , and vertices. Objects can have any combination of types. If there are multiple types close to the cursor, PyroSim will give vertices precedence over edges and edges precedence over faces.

Constraints are dynamic snapping lines that are only visible when the cursor is near them. They appear as infinite dotted lines as shown in Figure If a constraint is currently being snapped to, that constraint can be locked by holding SHIFT on the keyboard. While holding SHIFT , a second dotted line will extend from the cursor to the locked constraint the first dotted line.

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Vector operatibg is not made up of grids of pixels. Instead, vector graphics are comprised of vertices and paths. The three basic symbol types for vector data are points, lines, and polygons узнать больше здесь. These GIS file formats house vector data. The three required files are:. This includes vector points, lines and polygons as well as tabular information.

GeoJSON has a straightforward syntax that you can modify in any text editor. But JavaScript only understands binary objects. GML stores geographic entities features in the form of autodesk revit 2015 operating system unsupported free. Each feature has a list of properties, geometry points, lines, curves, surfaces, and polygonsand a spatial reference system.

This is because GML results in more data for the same amount of information. Because GPX is an exchange format, you can openly transfer GPS ooperating from one program to another based on its description properties. The minimum requirement for GPX are latitude and longitude coordinates.

In addition, GPX files optionally stores location properties including time, elevation and geoid height as tags. VCT formats are limited to points, lines, polygons, text, and photos. Attributes are stored directly in the vector files.

But you can optionally use independent data tables and value files. These files are читать статью collection of vector features from crowd-sourced contributions from the open community. Digital Line Graph DLG files are vectors in nature that were generated on traditional paper topographic maps.

Much of the U. It was used to store the US autodesk revit 2015 operating system unsupported free network for major urban areas, which is a key factor autodesk revit 2015 operating system unsupported free census information. ArcInfo Coverages are a set of folders containing points, arcs, polygons or annotations. Tics are geographic control points and help define the extent of the coverage.

Each feature is узнать больше здесь with a unique number. These feature numbers are a way to link attribute data with each spatial feature. Coverages were the standard format during the floppy disk era. Raster autdoesk is made up of pixels also referred to as grid cells. IMG files are commonly used for raster data to store single and multiple bands of satellite data.

For example, this can include file information, ground узнать больше здесь points, and sensor type. Each raster layer as part of an IMG file contains information about its data values. ASCII uses a auhodesk of numbers including floats between 0 and for information storage and processing. They also contain header information with a set of keywords. This could be comma, space or tab-delimited format. They consist of numeric grid cell values as integers, real numbers, bytes and RGB They assign the number of columns and rows to RST files.

Further to this, they record the file type, coordinate system, reference units and positional error. BIL files consist of a header file HDR that describes wystem number of columns, rows, bands, bit depth and layout in an image. For example, segments can include image channels, training site, and histogram information. As a database file, PIX files can hold raster channels unsupporhed varying bit depths. Grid files are a proprietary format developed by Esri.

Grids have no extension and are unique because they can hold attribute data in a raster file. But the catch is that you can only add attributes to integer grids. Attributes are stored in a value attribute table VAT — one record for each unique value in autodesk revit 2015 operating system unsupported free grid, and the count representing the number of cells.

The two types of Esri Grid files are integer and floating point grids. Land cover would be an example of a discrete grid. Each class has a unique integer cell value. Elevation data is an example of a floating point grid. Each cell represents an elevation floating value.

Lossy GIS compression reduces file size by permanently eliminating certain information, especially redundant information even though the user may not notice it. These lossy compression algorithms often result in greater reductions in file size. Here are examples of highly compressed GIS formats. ECW is a compressed image format typically for aerial and satellite imagery.

This GIS file type is known for its high compression ratios while still maintaining quality contrast in images. They autodesk revit 2015 operating system unsupported free a wavelet compression with the latest JPG format giving an option for lossy or lossless compression. They are an optimal choice читать статью background imagery because of its lossy compression.

MrSIDs have impressive compression ratios. Color autodesk revit 2015 operating system unsupported free can be compressed at a ratio of over autodesk revit 2015 operating system unsupported free We store geographic data in various database file formats. Esri created the file geodatabase to be a container for storing multiple attribute tables, vector and raster data sets. File geodatabases offer structural and performance advantages. They have fast performance, versatile relationships, compatible storage for rasters, improved spatial indexes, data compression, customizable configuration, and 1 terabyte file size restrictions.

Within a operaating, geographic datasets are referred to as feature classes. But geodatabases can fre more operrating data such as networks, raster mosaics, and feature data sets.

Personal vs File Geodatabase. They used to be the most ubiquitous database type for managing geospatial data. Personal geodatabases were advantageous because you could ujsupported multiple attribute tables, vector and raster datasets and create relationship classes.

But their biggest drawback was their limited 2GB in storage capacity. Whereas file geodatabases offer 2TB of capacity. GPKG are self-contained serverless SQLite databases that can contain anything from vector, tiles, rasters, layer attributes, and even extensions. The file format is based on a SQLite database.

The only coordinate system MBTiles support is spherical Mercator. Smallworld software is widely used in electrical, telecommunication, gas, water and utilities. VMDS stores multiple types of raster and vector geometries in spatial and topological utility networks. They are also autodesk revit 2015 operating system unsupported free of querying and analysis in GE Smallworld.

SpatiaLite uses the SQLite database engine. They are open source and lightweight with the ability ссылка на подробности hold spatial and non-spatial files in a single file container. They also support versioned editing, backups, and recovery of an enterprise database over the same network.

With support for different geometry types, the PostGIS spatial database allows querying and managing information about locations and mapping. ArcSDE serves data in a centralized way over an entire organization using a relational database management system. End-users can access spatial data in an Esri environment and seamlessly edit and analyze data in an enterprise geodatabase.

As по этому адресу cloud data, LiDAR is a dense network of coordinate points with elevation values. These GIS formats require specialized software or extensions to view or edit. The LAS file autodesk revit 2015 operating system unsupported free is a binary file format specifically for the interchange between vendors and customers.

The dense networks of coordinate point measurements are so large sometimes that they often autodesk revit 2015 operating system unsupported free to be split autodesk revit 2015 operating system unsupported free prevent the file size from becoming too large.

You can save significant storage space using the LAZ file format. Like most file compression, LAZ has no information loss.

Through LAS datasets, you can visualize triangulated surfaces and perform statistical analysis. The first 3 columns generally represent X, Y and Z coordinates. Non-binary sysrem like XYZ are advantageous because they can be opened and edited in a text editor. Similar to other CAD design formats, engineers and architects use it for construction design. Elevation file formats are specific to digital elevation model products. They are widely used in the industry because of the high volume of legacy elevation models produced by the USGS.

The DEM format is a single file containing 3 record types. They ffee a raster format consisting of terrain elevation values often captured from aircraft radar.

User-defined attributes are assigned through TAB files. The 3 levels of resolutions contain various cell-spacing resolution:. These web file formats are built specifically to serve and display geographic features over the internet. Although there are other web-based file formats that store geographic data such as GeoJSONthese file formats are unique to web mapping.

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System Requirements. The Enscape 3. If that software is not present the installer will prompt you to download and install whatever is missing from your system. NET Framework 4. Only docking stations that support accelerated graphics will work with Enscape.

Recommended Graphics Drivers. Enscape v3. System Support. Follow Us on. Enscape Newsletter. Start Enscape. Link Views to Settings Presets. XLS file. All the map layers and composers are stored in a QGS project file.

It retains the same, labeling, and map layers as they were since last saving. Map layers are referenced pointing to the physical data sources. These files are stored in the same directory as the project file. They can also contain connections to databases, servers and folders. But they are different from MXDs in that projects can have multiple maps and layouts in a single project. They contain common basemaps and page layouts to be reused repeatedly in an organization.

Your ArcGIS profile uses the normal. In order to fix map document issues, you can reset your application through the normal. The purpose of cartographic file formats is to standardize map creation with a set of symbols, labels, or feature displays.

But they contain the symbology to stylize your map features. Layer files are used for displaying a set of symbology in a map. Instead layer files simply specify how the data will be displayed. When you share a vector or raster data set, a layer file ensures the same symbology will be displayed on another map.

You can apply a QML file to any file without needing data. Three-dimensional file formats not only give XY locations of features but also add depth to features.

These 3D file formats are graphic representations of objects in the real world developed in 3D modeling software. This reference image file simulates textures in 3D web scenes in Esri and Google Earth. Generally, they are non-native formats specifically designed for interoperability and data transfer.

Esri ArcInfo Interchange files are no longer supported. It has the extension E00 and increases incrementally E01, E02… with individual coverage files. Although convenient for interchange, you need to process the data before you can add it to ArcGIS. The purpose of generating MPKs is to not only transfer the layers in a table of contents but the physical data that is associated with each layer in a data frame.

Once the MPK file is transferred, they have access to editing their own source version of data. This list of file extensions and formats is specific to indoor mapping , which can be incorporated in building a seamless 2D or 3D for different floor levels inherent in buildings.

They are geographic in nature and perform a specific function related to the analysis, management, or display of geographic information.

ECD files classify a raster dataset during the segmentation and classification process. They specify the trained samples of remote sensing raster data sets for supervised classification.

From 2D to 3D, three-dimensional file formats add depth. Then from fixed to dynamic time, multi-temporal formats add the element of time. GIS is truly one of the most diverse and expanding technologies, as shown by the plethora of GIS formats in the industry. Thanks for the great list! What about layer style formats? Like SLD for instance. ADF, however like shapes and filegdb there is more than one file on disk for a single raster. CPG describe the encoding applied to create the shapefile.

Where are MapInfo file formats? Since when is Postgis a file format? Thanks for the overview but I want to correct two points. Your email address will not be published. Skip to content. Some geospatial data formats are common.

But some are not so common. First, take a look at these 63 formats in GIS. Then, bookmark it for future reference:. Subscribe to our newsletter:. I would love it if you added the following file formats:. Thank you! Leave a Reply Your email address will not be published. Toggle Menu Close. Search for: Search. All commercial and open source accept shapefile as a GIS format.

The three required files are: SHP is the feature geometry. SHX is the shape index position. DBF is the attribute data. You can optionally include these files but are not completely necessary. PRJ is the projection system metadata. XML is the associated metadata. SBN is the spatial index for optimizing queries. SBX optimizes loading times. Similar to shapefiles, they require a set of files to represent geographic information and attributes.

ID files are index files that link graphical objects to database information. MAP files are the map objects that store geographic information. IND files are index files for the tabular data. AUX auxiliary files store projections and other information.

OVR pyramid files improves performance for raster display. Whereas Band interleaved by pixel BIP assigns pixel values for each band by rows. Finally, Band sequential format BSQ stores separate bands by rows. They generally contain elements such as edges, curves, and annotation text in layers. Every element plots XY points in a grid. By default, the model contains one floor at elevation 0. Using these values leaves a distance of 3. Once the floors have been defined, the user can filter the display to show either a single floor or all floors as shown in Figure 7.

For most views, the Z clipping range for a particular floor is from the floor elevation minus slab thickness to floor elevation plus wall height. The Z clipping range works differently for the top camera of the 2D view, however. In this view, the clipping is from the elevation of the floor BELOW to the elevation plus wall height of the current floor. This allows the geometry on the floor below to be snapped to in drawing geometry for the current floor.

For this to be useful, however, the user may want to use wireframe rendering. Each floor can have an associated background image. To add a background image to a floor, go to the 2D or 3D View, select a specific floor, then click the Configure Background Image button.

Alternately click the Define Floor Locations button, , and then in the Background Image column, select the Edit button. This will display the Configure Background Image dialog shown in Figure Now, in the 3D or 2D views, when the user displays a specific floor, the background image for that floor will be displayed.

To turn off the background images, go to the 2D or 3D View, and click the Show Background Images button next to the floors drop-down. While not a full-fledged drafting application, PyroSim does provide useful drawing features, including the following:. PyroSim provides several drawing and editing tools. These tools are located on the drawing toolbar at the left side of the 3D and 2D Views as shown in Figure Some of these tools allow a user to create and edit objects such as slabs and walls that are not constrained to the FDS mesh.

In these cases, PyroSim will automatically convert the shapes to mesh-based blocks when the FDS input file is created. For information on block conversion, see Section To begin drawing or editing with a tool, the user can single-click the tool from the tool bar. The button will show a green dot when pinned. Every time the same tool button is clicked, the pinned state of that tool will be toggled, so clicking the button again after pinning will disable pinning.

This will also cancel pinning and will revert back to the last-used navigation tool. Each tool has a set of properties that can be modified by clicking the Tool Properties button located at the bottom of the toolbar after selecting the desired tool. Options such as elevation, height, surface, and color can all be edited in the Tool Properties dialog.

In addition to the tool properties, each tool also has additional quick actions. To show these actions, start the desired tool and then right-click in the 2D or 3D View. This opens a context menu with the quick actions.

Figure 60 shows an example of the quick action menu for the wall tool. This menu allows the user to perform actions specific to the tool, such as closing a polygon, picking a surface, setting wall alignment, accessing the tool properties, etc.

Snapping is one way to precisely draw and edit objects. It is the process of finding some element in the scene, such as a vertex or edge close to the cursor, and snapping the cursor to that element like a magnet.

In PyroSim, snapping can be performed against the solution meshes, objects in the model, and orthographic constraints. The 2D View additionally provides a sketch grid and polar angle constraints. If a snap point is found, an indicator dot shown in Figure 61 will appear at the snap point.

By default, snapping is enabled. If there are any solution meshes in the model see Chapter 5 , PyroSim can snap to them during drawing and editing. For each mesh that is visible, PyroSim can snap to its boundary edges, boundary faces, grid lines, and the intersections of the grid lines, depending on which mesh display filters are active as discussed in Section 2. PyroSim also provides a user-defined drawing grid, or sketch grid, in the 2D View as shown in Figure When a new model is created, the sketch grid is visible and can be snapped to in the 2D view.

The default spacing for the divisions is 1 m, but can be changed by going to the View menu and clicking Set Sketch Grid Spacing. Once the user has created a solution mesh, PyroSim will automatically switch to solution mesh snapping and disable sketch grid snapping.

In the 2D View , PyroSim will only snap to the sketch grid or visible solution meshes. To disable grid snapping altogether, on the View menu choose Disable Grid Snapping. There are three basic categories of geometry that can be snapped to on objects: faces , edges , and vertices. Objects can have any combination of types.

If there are multiple types close to the cursor, PyroSim will give vertices precedence over edges and edges precedence over faces. Constraints are dynamic snapping lines that are only visible when the cursor is near them. They appear as infinite dotted lines as shown in Figure If a constraint is currently being snapped to, that constraint can be locked by holding SHIFT on the keyboard.

While holding SHIFT , a second dotted line will extend from the cursor to the locked constraint the first dotted line. This is useful for lining up objects along a constraint with other objects. For instance, in Figure 64 , a box already exists in the model.

A second slab is being drawn such that the third point of the slab lines up with the right side of the first box. This was done as follows:.

This window shows the value used to determine the next point or value for the current tool. In this figure the value is the Distance from the previous point along the vector from the previous point to the current cursor location. For other tools, this value may be angle or relative offset, etc.

The value is editable if the status bar at the bottom of the 3D or 2D View indicates it is. If the user starts typing, the popup window will be replaced with an editing window as shown in Figure If the user presses ESC instead, the keyboard entry will be cancelled. Pressing TAB cycles through alternate input methods to determine the next value.

For instance, pressing TAB with the wall tool allows the user to enter a relative offset from the last point instead of a distance. Pressing TAB a second time allows the user to enter an absolute position for the next point, and pressing TAB a third time will cycle back to the distance input. Precise keyboard entry may be easiest for some users when using the multi-click mode of drawing rather than using the click-drag mode.

Using multi-click allows both hands to be used to type as opposed to click-drag, which requires one hand to remain on the mouse. There are some key differences between drawing in the 2D and 3D Views. The 2D View is useful when drawing should be restricted to one pre-defined plane. It is also useful for lining up objects along the X, Y, or Z axes. The 3D View is useful when an object such as a vent or solid-phase device needs to be snapped to the face of an obstruction or vent or if the user would like to build objects by stacking them on top of one another.

When drawing in the 2D View , the drawing will always take place in the drawing plane specified in the tool properties, and snapping is only performed in the local X and Y dimensions. The local Z value will remain true to the drawing plane. In addition, if a tool has some sort of height or depth property, the tool will also remain true to that value. While snapping was used to partially align the objects, they both remain in the Z planes specified in their tool properties shown in the rotated view Figure The 3D View uses snapping in all three dimensions, causing tool properties to be interpreted more loosely.

The drawing plane and depth properties for a drawn object are context-sensitive in the 3D View. When using tools such as the slab tool, the first clicked point determines the drawing plane.

If, on this first click, another object is snapped to, the drawing plane is set at the Z location of that snap point. This 3D snapping feature of the 3D View is useful for drawing vents on obstructions and attaching solid-phase devices to obstructions as shown in Figure The 3D snapping feature is also useful for stacking objects, as shown in Figure In this figure, the drawing plane was never changed.

All the objects were stacked on top of each other using snapping. While stacking can be useful for obstructions, a user must be more careful when drawing holes in the 3D View. For instance, with the slab hole tool and block hole tool , the user will need to change the extrusion direction to properly direct the hole into the obstruction.

For instance, if the user draws a slab obstruction in the 3D View and then draws a slab hole while snapping to the obstruction, the hole will be stacked on top of the obstruction without cutting a hole as shown in Figure This will result in a proper hole as shown in Figure This is not a problem in the 2D View since it always uses the drawing plane set in the tool properties instead of stacking the objects.

Once the drawing plane for a tool has been established by the first click, the tool can still determine the next points by snapping to objects in another plane. In this case, the snapped points will be projected to the drawing plane for the current tool. A dotted line will show how the snapped point was projected to the plane. There are four tools that can draw obstructions, for more information on obstructions, see Section 8.

Slab Obstruction Tool: Used to draw the slab for a floor. Wall Obstruction Tool : Used to draw a wall. Block Obstruction Tool: Used to fill grid cells with obstructions. Room Tool: Used to draw a rectangular room. For all the obstruction tools, the tool properties dialog will appear similar to that in Figure The only section of the dialog that will change between these tools is the geometry, such as Z Location and Thickness.

All other properties, including name, surface, color, and obstruction flags appear in all obstruction dialogs. These parameters control the properties that will be applied to the next drawn obstruction. The surface and color of the next obstruction can also be set via the right-click menu for the tool.

A slab is an extruded polygonal object as shown in Figure 75 that can be used to draw the slab for a floor in a building. The slab obstruction tool adds two additional properties to the tool dialog for obstructions:. The wall obstruction tool can be used to draw multi-segmented walls as shown in Figure In this figure, there is only one wall. The user specifies a path along the floor from which the wall is extruded up.

The wall can be aligned to the left, right, or center of the drawn path. The alignment of the wall can be controlled through the right-click menu for the tool or can be cycled by pressing the CTRL key on the keyboard.

If the first clicked point is clicked again after drawing at least two segments or Close is chosen from the right-click menu, the tool will draw one last segment from the last clicked point to the first point and finish. Alternately, the wall can be ended at the last clicked point by choosing Finish from the right-click menu. The Block Obstruction Tool can be used to quickly fill grid cells with blocks as shown in Figure 80 or place a block with a single click. In addition, the extrusion direction for the block can be toggled by pressing CTRL on the keyboard or through the right-click menu for the tool.

The Room Tool can be used to draw a rectangular room using one closed wall as shown in Figure The room tool contains the same properties as the wall obstruction tool. There are three tools that can draw holes, for more information on holes, see Section 8. Slab Hole Tool: Used to draw a hole in a floor slab. Wall Hole Tool : Used to draw an opening in a wall, such as for a doorway or window. Block Hole Tool: Used to fill grid cells with holes.

All these tools work the same as their obstruction counterparts, but they do not have the properties specific to obstructions, such as the surface or obstruction flags.

There is only one tool for drawing vents for more information on vents, see Section 8. PyroSim only allows vents in an X, Y, or Z plane. Vents cannot currently be drawn off-axis like walls can.

Vents also must be attached to solid obstructions at least one grid cell thick. This is easily accomplished by drawing the vent in the 3D View see Section 9.

Solution meshes can be easily split into two or more sub-meshes by using the Mesh Splitter Tool. PyroSim allows point devices to be drawn with the Device Tool , for more information on devices, Chapter This makes it trivial to attach a solid-phase device to an obstruction. This makes it easy to draw devices at a specific height above the floor. Lock Z to [V] is the automatic behavior for gas-phase devices and Lock Z to Snap Location is the automatic behavior for solid-phase devices.

Planar slices, as discussed in Section The slice plane can be changed through the right-click menu, by click-dragging the left mouse button, or by pressing CTRL on the keyboard to cycle through the options.

HVAC nodes as discussed in Section Init Regions Section Particle Clouds Section Pressure Zones with the with the Zone Tool. These tools draw axis-aligned boxes, and so they behave similarly. They all have the following drawing properties:. Handles appear on an object either as a blue dot as shown in Figure 90 or a face with a different color.

The dots indicate a point that can be moved in either two or three dimensions. A discolored face indicates that a face can be moved or extruded along a line. PyroSim provides a variety of tools to transform geometry objects. With the transform tools, users can move, rotate, and mirror objects.

Each tool has an alternate mode to copy the source objects with the transform. When using copy mode, the selected objects are copied and the copies are transformed. This tool allows the user to move selected objects to a new location as shown in Figure This tool allows the user to rotate selected objects as shown in Rotating an object with the Rotate Tool. The selected objects will be rotated by the angle between the reference and angle vectors.

The mirror tool allows objects to be mirrored across a plane as shown in Mirroring an object using the Mirror Tool below. The right-click menu also allows quick selection of a surface in the model or recently-used color. PyroSim provides a Measure Tool to measure distances in the model. This chapter provides guidance on using the geometry tools available in PyroSim to create several geometric shapes that often appear in building models.

The ability to sketch in different planes, copy, replicate, drag, scale, and rotate objects can greatly simplify the tasks of geometry creation. In all of the following examples, we will use a background image as a pattern to draw against.

While this is not required, it makes creating curved surfaces much easier and one of the strengths of PyroSim is that it allows you to sketch geometry directly on top of building design images.

The background image we will be using is shown in Figure For simplicity, we will assume that horizontal distance across the entire image is 50 feet, and we will place the origin of the model at the lower-left corner of the room shown in the image. The Configure Background Image dialog shown in Figure illustrates these settings. This is the fastest way to create smooth curves in PyroSim.

PyroSim will convert the curved walls to blocks before running the FDS simulation. While smaller segments will make the wall look better in PyroSim, placement of obstructions generated for FDS depends on the resolution of your mesh. A curved wall drawn with three different segment lengths created with this technique are shown below.

Using extremely short line segments will probably not be of any benefit unless you also use very small mesh cells. This technique forces you to convert the curve to blocks manually, but the advantage is you know exactly what geometry will be generated for FDS.

If you have a high resolution mesh, it may be useful to drag the mouse and “paint” the curve rather than clicking individual blocks. The example curved wall is shown in Figure To create curved objects using the rotation technique, you must place an initial segment, then perform a rotate-copy operation about the center point of your desired curve. If we would have created 60 copies instead of 15 this procedure would have created a cylinder. While complicated, the rotation approach is the most effective at creating complex symmetrical geometry.

Trusses can be created by drawing a single truss out of slab obstructions and slab holes, then replicating that truss as many times as needed as shown in Figure You can quickly add a roof to the model using the Slab Obstruction Tool. The extruded polygon tool can be used to create obstructions with any number of boundary points triangles, quads, etc.

Users can create simple stairways by placing the initial stair, then using the translate-copy operation. This section will present a simple example to illustrate the approach. We will create a 10 step stairway. Each step will have a 7 inch rise 0. The stairway itself will be 24 inches 2. To keep things as simple as possible, we will construct the stairway in an empty model. PyroSim relies heavily on the idea of selected objects. For almost all operations, the user first selects an object s and then changes the selected object s.

The Selection Tool is used to select objects. Selection can be made in any of the views using the Selection tool. Multiple objects can be selected using the Ctrl key or click and drag to define a box. In the Navigation View, the Shift key can be used to select a consecutive list of objects. A right-click on a selection displays a context menu. This menu includes the most common options for working with the object. The user may also right-click on individual objects for immediate display of the context menu.

Alternately, right-click on an object to display the context menu with Copy. Alternately, right-click on an object to display the context menu with Paste. By running two instances of PyroSim, you can copy objects from one model and paste them into a second model. If the copied objects rely on other properties, such as surfaces, that are not included in the second model, these properties will be pasted into the model when the objects are pasted.

For example the user can select an object in PyroSim, open a text file, and paste the object. The text FDS representations of the object and dependent properties will be pasted.

The object will be added to the PyroSim model. An error message will be received if the pasted object depends on data that is not available in the PyroSim model. The user will then need to paste that information such as surface properties first before pasting the geometric object. The Translate dialog can be used to both move an object and to create copies of an object, each offset in space. The Mode selects either the option to move only the selected object or to create copies of the object and move them.

The Offset parameters indicate the increment to move or offset the copies. To preview the changes without applying them, click Preview. To apply the changes and close the dialog, click OK. To cancel the changes instead, click Cancel.

The Mirror dialog can be used to mirror an object about a plane or planes. To mirror an object in this manner, perform the following:.

The Mode selects either the option to mirror only the selected object or to create a mirrored copy of the object. The Mirror Plane s define planes normal to the X, Y, and Z axes about which the object will be mirrored. The Use Center button can be used to fill the Mirror Plane data with the center coordinates of the selected objects. The Scale dialog can be used to change the size of an object.

To scale an object, perform the following:. The Mode selects either the option to scale only the selected object or to create multiple scaled copies of the object. The Scale values define the scale factors in the X, Y, and Z directions. The Base Point defines the point about which the scaling will be performed. The Use Center button can be used to fill the Base Point data with the center coordinates of the selected objects.

The Mode selects either the option to rotate only the selected object or to create multiple rotated copies of the object.

The Rotation values allow the user to select the axis about which the rotation will be made and the angle is the rotation angle counter-clockwise is positive. The Base Point defines the point about which the rotation will be performed.

Often it is desirable to turn off the display of selected objects, for example, to hide a roof of a building in order to visualize the interior.

In any of the views, right-click on a selection to obtain the following options:. Gas species can serve many different roles in a PyroSim model. In the simplest applications, a number of gaseous species are implicitly defined and tracked within the simulator to model the combustion of hydrocarbon fuels.

By default, PyroSim adds all species which have been implicitly defined by FDS to the model on startup. These species are unique from those involved in the reaction chemistry, and will not take part in the simple reaction chemistry if referenced. While PyroSim manually handles the logic that determines whether or not it is necessary to include a species in the FDS input file, it is important to understand what requires a species line be written to the output. A species referenced by any of the following will cause it to be written:.

Three different classifications of species type can be created in a PyroSim model. The second type are custom primitive species. These differ from predefined species in that they must have their chemical properties defined. And lastly, there are custom lumped species, which are defined as either a mass or volume fraction of predefined and custom primitive species.

Species can be managed by opening the Model menu and selecting Edit Species. To create either a new species, or include a predefined one, select New and choose whether the species should be Predefined, Primitive, or Lumped. Primitive species can be tracked individually, or as a component of a more complex lumped species. Species mixtures can be defined as a mixture of any number of primitive species. Because all species in the simulation must be tracked by a transport equation, a lumped species can be used to save on simulation time.

When using lumped species, it is recommended that certain actions be taken to reduce the complexity of the simulation. Doing this check for all primitive species will reduce the number of transport equations solved by the simulator, and save significant time on the simulation.

This chapter provides an overview of how to specify combustion the reaction of fuel vapor and oxygen using PyroSim. The former refers to the reaction of fuel vapor and oxygen; the latter the generation of fuel vapor at a solid or liquid surface.

In an FDS fire simulation, there is only one gaseous fuel that acts as a surrogate for all the potential fuel sources. A more complex approach is to define a material with a pyrolysis reaction.

The fuel composition is entered on the Fuel tab. Alternately, the user can select the fuel from a predefined species list that is given in the FDS User Guide, Table PyroSim supports the custom smoke features available in FDS. To create custom smoke, first define an species with the desired mass extinction coefficient.

This “smoke” species can then be injected into the domain like any other species. Finally, if the Results should track this species as smoke, go to the Analysis menu, select Simulation Parameters. Note that in addition to specifying the mass fraction of a species, the mass fraction of any mixture fraction species can also be selected for smoke display, including the mass fraction of oxygen, water vapor, and the other species specified in the gas-phase reaction.

PyroSim supports three types of particles: massless tracers, liquid droplets, and solid particles. To create a new particle:. Evaporating liquid droplets can be used with sprinkler spray models and nozzles to customize the spray. They can also be used in particle clouds and surface types that support particle injection.

To specify a liquid droplet, you must specify a species. This can be one of the predefined species recognized in Table If the species is not predefined, it is important to specify the liquid properties of the species. Drage refers to the drag force the particle exerts on the flow around it, see section ” Liquid particles can be injected into the domain as evaporating fuel vapor that will burn according to the combustion model specified in the active reaction. PyroSim provides basic support for specifying solid particles.

A solid particle must reference a surface, from which it derives its thermophysical and geometric parameters. A solid particle can be used to model various heat transfer, drag, and vegetation applications. Most of the parameters unique to solid particles must be defined on the Advanced Panel, see Chapter Massless tracer particles can be used to track air flow within a simulation. They can also be used in particle clouds. By default, PyroSim provides a black, massless tracer particle called Tracer.

To use a custom tracer particle in your simulation, you can modify the parameters of this default particle to suit your needs, or you can create a new particle.

Normally, the insertion of particles into the domain is controlled by the surface or object emitting them, such as by a fan or supply surface or a particle cloud. Alternatively, the insertion of particles can be controlled by a device or other control logic. For more information on controls, see Chapter There are two global options relating to particles in the Simulation Parameters dialog. The first option, Droplets Disappear at Floor , can be used to prevent droplets from gathering on the floor of the simulation area.

The default value for this option is ON. The second option, Max Particles per Mesh , can be used to set an upper limit on the number of particles allowed in any simulation mesh. Particle Clouds provide a way to insert particles into the simulation either in a box-shaped region or at a specific point.

Particles can either exist at the start of the FDS simulation or can be inserted periodically. To create a particle cloud, on the Model menu, click either New Particle Cloud. This will show the particle cloud dialog as in Figure The geometry properties, including the size and location of the volume or the point location can be specified on the Geometry tab.

Press OK to create the new particle cloud. It will appear as a translucent box or a point in the 3D and 2D Views. Devices are used to record quantities in the model or to represent more complex sensors, such as smoke detectors, sprinklers, and thermocouples. Devices can be moved, copied, rotated, and scaled using the tools described in Chapter By copying a single device along a line and then copying the line in the normal direction, it is possible to quickly define an array of devices.

When a device is defined, a trigger value setpoint can be created that can be used to activate other objects. This is discussed more in Chapter In addition, the output of a device can be frozen at its current value when another control activates. This can be used to create more complex logic, such as holding the heat release rate of a fire at its current value when a sprinkler activates. An aspiration detection system groups together a series of soot measurement devices.

An aspiration system consists of a sampling pipe network that draws air from a series of locations to a central point where an obscuration measurement is made. To define such a system in FDS, you must provide the sampling locations, sampling flow rates, the transport time from each sampling location, and if an alarm output is desired, the overall obscuration setpoint. Supply the following information for the aspiration detection system, Figure Simple gas phase and solid phase devices can be used to measure quantities in the gas or solid phase.

To create a thermocouple, on the Devices menu, click New Thermocouple. The output of the thermocouple is the temperature of the thermocouple itself, which is usually close to the gas temperature, but not always, since radiation is included in the calculation of thermocouple temperature.

The flow measurement device can be used to measure a flow quantity through an area. The heat release rate device measures the heat release rate within a volume. There is often the need to estimate the location of the interface between the hot, smoke-laden upper layer and the cooler lower layer in a burning compartment. Relatively simple fire models, often referred to as two-zone models, compute this quantity directly, along with the average temperature of the upper and lower layers.

In a computational fluid dynamics CFD model like FDS, there are not two distinct zones, but rather a continuous profile of temperature. FDS uses an algorithm based on integration along a line to estimate the layer height and the average upper and lower layer temperatures. A beam detector measures the total obscuration between points. A heat detector measures the temperature at a location using a Response Time Index model. To define a heat detector device, on the Devices menu, click New Heat Detector.

A smoke detector measures obscuration at a point with two characteristic fill-in or “lag” times. To define a smoke detector, on the Devices menu, click New Smoke Detector. Nozzles are very much like sprinklers, only they do not activate based on the standard RTI model.

They can be set to activate by custom control logic. Objects can be set to activate or deactivate during the simulation using activation events. Activation events are the control logic system in FDS and can be set on each geometric simulation object e. PyroSim supports activation events based on time and input devices. Some uses of activation events include:. After selecting an input type and an action, a pattern in sentence form for describing the control logic will appear in the dialog.

Some key words and numbers will be drawn in blue and underlined. Any blue text can be clicked to modify the behavior of the specific control. Figure shows the selector popup for objects. Objects are selected by name.

Activation controls are stored separately from specific geometric objects. This makes it possible to bind an object to a control after it has been created. Figure shows the activation control in the object properties dialog for a hole. Once a control has been bound to an object or objects any objects linked to that control will show a text description of the control in their properties editor. This text will be shown in blue and underlined and can be clicked to edit the activation control.

Changes made to the activation control will impact all referencing objects. To create or remove an object at a specific time, select Time for the Input Type in the Activation Controls dialog. When using time as the input, objects can be created at a specific time, removed at a specific time, or be created and removed periodically throughout the simulation. When performing multiple timed events, the creation and removal and times at which they occur are specified in the table at the bottom of the dialog.

The create and remove events should alternate as time increases. To create or remove some objects based on a device in the model, the device must first have a setpoint enabled. Once the desired devices have been given a setpoint, they can be used as inputs to the control logic expression. If more than one detector is to be used to activate the objects, the descriptive sentence can be used to decide if the objects should trigger when any, all, or a certain number of the devices activate.

A duct is required for any HVAC system. Note that an HVAC Fan is a class of object, and a single fan definition can be used by any number of ducts.

A given filter can limit the flow of any number of valid species defined in the model. Note that an HVAC Filter is a class of object, and a single filter definition can be referenced by any number of nodes. Note that an HVAC Aircoil is a class of object, and a single aircoil definition can be used by any number of ducts.

See Section 8. In this chapter we describe the simulation output options available in PyroSim. Each of these options is located in the Output menu.

Find and replace text values on properties. Can be used without any CAD software being installed. Update and correct non-existing paths to improve performance of the Sheet Set Manager.

DST Converter. SSMPropEditor System requirements. NET Framework 4. To rename the actual layout name full AutoCAD or newer needs to be installed. Version History. Version History Known issues in latest release and possibly older releases: Editing model view paths is not working.

Changing language within the application requires to restart it to avoid unexpected problems. Vault is by default supported. Contact us for other versions to be supported. Most recent and previous versions: – version Add handling of ignoring empty rows in imported Excel file.

Corrected handling of DST icon in Explorer. Wishes and feature requests Optionally have a spread sheet view or grid to edit the values in. To manually rearrange the sheets or subsets and view categories. Rename categories. Support to manipulate the. The ability to move sheet views from one sheet to another, while maintaining linked callouts.

Change case. Workaround is to export to Excel, change case and import Spell check. Workaround is to export to Excel, spell check and import Delete selected sheets or subset including sheets. Tool to help migrate data from old title blocks with normal attributes to attributes with fields connected to the sheet set. Create a new sheet set from scratch based on data in an Excel file or the like with either using existing drawings or creating new ones.

To sort properties in a custom order. Saved settings in a separate file saved in same folder as the DST. Create subsets. Duplicate existing subset. Ability to remove multiple subsets at once or even deleting a subset and all the sheets associated with it. The mirror tool allows objects to be mirrored across a plane as shown in Mirroring an object using the Mirror Tool below. The right-click menu also allows quick selection of a surface in the model or recently-used color.

PyroSim provides a Measure Tool to measure distances in the model. This chapter provides guidance on using the geometry tools available in PyroSim to create several geometric shapes that often appear in building models.

The ability to sketch in different planes, copy, replicate, drag, scale, and rotate objects can greatly simplify the tasks of geometry creation. In all of the following examples, we will use a background image as a pattern to draw against.

While this is not required, it makes creating curved surfaces much easier and one of the strengths of PyroSim is that it allows you to sketch geometry directly on top of building design images.

The background image we will be using is shown in Figure For simplicity, we will assume that horizontal distance across the entire image is 50 feet, and we will place the origin of the model at the lower-left corner of the room shown in the image.

The Configure Background Image dialog shown in Figure illustrates these settings. This is the fastest way to create smooth curves in PyroSim. PyroSim will convert the curved walls to blocks before running the FDS simulation. While smaller segments will make the wall look better in PyroSim, placement of obstructions generated for FDS depends on the resolution of your mesh.

A curved wall drawn with three different segment lengths created with this technique are shown below. Using extremely short line segments will probably not be of any benefit unless you also use very small mesh cells. This technique forces you to convert the curve to blocks manually, but the advantage is you know exactly what geometry will be generated for FDS. If you have a high resolution mesh, it may be useful to drag the mouse and “paint” the curve rather than clicking individual blocks.

The example curved wall is shown in Figure To create curved objects using the rotation technique, you must place an initial segment, then perform a rotate-copy operation about the center point of your desired curve. If we would have created 60 copies instead of 15 this procedure would have created a cylinder.

While complicated, the rotation approach is the most effective at creating complex symmetrical geometry. Trusses can be created by drawing a single truss out of slab obstructions and slab holes, then replicating that truss as many times as needed as shown in Figure You can quickly add a roof to the model using the Slab Obstruction Tool. The extruded polygon tool can be used to create obstructions with any number of boundary points triangles, quads, etc.

Users can create simple stairways by placing the initial stair, then using the translate-copy operation. This section will present a simple example to illustrate the approach.

We will create a 10 step stairway. Each step will have a 7 inch rise 0. The stairway itself will be 24 inches 2.

To keep things as simple as possible, we will construct the stairway in an empty model. PyroSim relies heavily on the idea of selected objects. For almost all operations, the user first selects an object s and then changes the selected object s. The Selection Tool is used to select objects. Selection can be made in any of the views using the Selection tool. Multiple objects can be selected using the Ctrl key or click and drag to define a box. In the Navigation View, the Shift key can be used to select a consecutive list of objects.

A right-click on a selection displays a context menu. This menu includes the most common options for working with the object. The user may also right-click on individual objects for immediate display of the context menu. Alternately, right-click on an object to display the context menu with Copy. Alternately, right-click on an object to display the context menu with Paste. By running two instances of PyroSim, you can copy objects from one model and paste them into a second model.

If the copied objects rely on other properties, such as surfaces, that are not included in the second model, these properties will be pasted into the model when the objects are pasted. For example the user can select an object in PyroSim, open a text file, and paste the object.

The text FDS representations of the object and dependent properties will be pasted. The object will be added to the PyroSim model. An error message will be received if the pasted object depends on data that is not available in the PyroSim model. The user will then need to paste that information such as surface properties first before pasting the geometric object. The Translate dialog can be used to both move an object and to create copies of an object, each offset in space.

The Mode selects either the option to move only the selected object or to create copies of the object and move them. The Offset parameters indicate the increment to move or offset the copies. To preview the changes without applying them, click Preview. To apply the changes and close the dialog, click OK. To cancel the changes instead, click Cancel. The Mirror dialog can be used to mirror an object about a plane or planes. To mirror an object in this manner, perform the following:.

The Mode selects either the option to mirror only the selected object or to create a mirrored copy of the object. The Mirror Plane s define planes normal to the X, Y, and Z axes about which the object will be mirrored.

The Use Center button can be used to fill the Mirror Plane data with the center coordinates of the selected objects. The Scale dialog can be used to change the size of an object. To scale an object, perform the following:.

The Mode selects either the option to scale only the selected object or to create multiple scaled copies of the object. The Scale values define the scale factors in the X, Y, and Z directions.

The Base Point defines the point about which the scaling will be performed. The Use Center button can be used to fill the Base Point data with the center coordinates of the selected objects. The Mode selects either the option to rotate only the selected object or to create multiple rotated copies of the object.

The Rotation values allow the user to select the axis about which the rotation will be made and the angle is the rotation angle counter-clockwise is positive. The Base Point defines the point about which the rotation will be performed. Often it is desirable to turn off the display of selected objects, for example, to hide a roof of a building in order to visualize the interior.

In any of the views, right-click on a selection to obtain the following options:. Gas species can serve many different roles in a PyroSim model. In the simplest applications, a number of gaseous species are implicitly defined and tracked within the simulator to model the combustion of hydrocarbon fuels.

By default, PyroSim adds all species which have been implicitly defined by FDS to the model on startup. These species are unique from those involved in the reaction chemistry, and will not take part in the simple reaction chemistry if referenced. While PyroSim manually handles the logic that determines whether or not it is necessary to include a species in the FDS input file, it is important to understand what requires a species line be written to the output.

A species referenced by any of the following will cause it to be written:. Three different classifications of species type can be created in a PyroSim model. The second type are custom primitive species. These differ from predefined species in that they must have their chemical properties defined. And lastly, there are custom lumped species, which are defined as either a mass or volume fraction of predefined and custom primitive species.

Species can be managed by opening the Model menu and selecting Edit Species. To create either a new species, or include a predefined one, select New and choose whether the species should be Predefined, Primitive, or Lumped.

Primitive species can be tracked individually, or as a component of a more complex lumped species. Species mixtures can be defined as a mixture of any number of primitive species.

Because all species in the simulation must be tracked by a transport equation, a lumped species can be used to save on simulation time. When using lumped species, it is recommended that certain actions be taken to reduce the complexity of the simulation.

Doing this check for all primitive species will reduce the number of transport equations solved by the simulator, and save significant time on the simulation. This chapter provides an overview of how to specify combustion the reaction of fuel vapor and oxygen using PyroSim.

The former refers to the reaction of fuel vapor and oxygen; the latter the generation of fuel vapor at a solid or liquid surface. In an FDS fire simulation, there is only one gaseous fuel that acts as a surrogate for all the potential fuel sources. A more complex approach is to define a material with a pyrolysis reaction.

The fuel composition is entered on the Fuel tab. Alternately, the user can select the fuel from a predefined species list that is given in the FDS User Guide, Table PyroSim supports the custom smoke features available in FDS. To create custom smoke, first define an species with the desired mass extinction coefficient. This “smoke” species can then be injected into the domain like any other species. Finally, if the Results should track this species as smoke, go to the Analysis menu, select Simulation Parameters.

Note that in addition to specifying the mass fraction of a species, the mass fraction of any mixture fraction species can also be selected for smoke display, including the mass fraction of oxygen, water vapor, and the other species specified in the gas-phase reaction. PyroSim supports three types of particles: massless tracers, liquid droplets, and solid particles.

To create a new particle:. Evaporating liquid droplets can be used with sprinkler spray models and nozzles to customize the spray. They can also be used in particle clouds and surface types that support particle injection. To specify a liquid droplet, you must specify a species. This can be one of the predefined species recognized in Table If the species is not predefined, it is important to specify the liquid properties of the species.

Drage refers to the drag force the particle exerts on the flow around it, see section ” Liquid particles can be injected into the domain as evaporating fuel vapor that will burn according to the combustion model specified in the active reaction. PyroSim provides basic support for specifying solid particles.

A solid particle must reference a surface, from which it derives its thermophysical and geometric parameters. A solid particle can be used to model various heat transfer, drag, and vegetation applications. Most of the parameters unique to solid particles must be defined on the Advanced Panel, see Chapter Massless tracer particles can be used to track air flow within a simulation. They can also be used in particle clouds.

By default, PyroSim provides a black, massless tracer particle called Tracer. To use a custom tracer particle in your simulation, you can modify the parameters of this default particle to suit your needs, or you can create a new particle. Normally, the insertion of particles into the domain is controlled by the surface or object emitting them, such as by a fan or supply surface or a particle cloud. Alternatively, the insertion of particles can be controlled by a device or other control logic.

For more information on controls, see Chapter There are two global options relating to particles in the Simulation Parameters dialog. The first option, Droplets Disappear at Floor , can be used to prevent droplets from gathering on the floor of the simulation area. The default value for this option is ON. The second option, Max Particles per Mesh , can be used to set an upper limit on the number of particles allowed in any simulation mesh.

Particle Clouds provide a way to insert particles into the simulation either in a box-shaped region or at a specific point. Particles can either exist at the start of the FDS simulation or can be inserted periodically. To create a particle cloud, on the Model menu, click either New Particle Cloud. This will show the particle cloud dialog as in Figure The geometry properties, including the size and location of the volume or the point location can be specified on the Geometry tab.

Press OK to create the new particle cloud. It will appear as a translucent box or a point in the 3D and 2D Views. Devices are used to record quantities in the model or to represent more complex sensors, such as smoke detectors, sprinklers, and thermocouples. Devices can be moved, copied, rotated, and scaled using the tools described in Chapter By copying a single device along a line and then copying the line in the normal direction, it is possible to quickly define an array of devices.

When a device is defined, a trigger value setpoint can be created that can be used to activate other objects. This is discussed more in Chapter In addition, the output of a device can be frozen at its current value when another control activates. This can be used to create more complex logic, such as holding the heat release rate of a fire at its current value when a sprinkler activates. An aspiration detection system groups together a series of soot measurement devices.

An aspiration system consists of a sampling pipe network that draws air from a series of locations to a central point where an obscuration measurement is made. To define such a system in FDS, you must provide the sampling locations, sampling flow rates, the transport time from each sampling location, and if an alarm output is desired, the overall obscuration setpoint.

Supply the following information for the aspiration detection system, Figure Simple gas phase and solid phase devices can be used to measure quantities in the gas or solid phase. To create a thermocouple, on the Devices menu, click New Thermocouple. The output of the thermocouple is the temperature of the thermocouple itself, which is usually close to the gas temperature, but not always, since radiation is included in the calculation of thermocouple temperature.

The flow measurement device can be used to measure a flow quantity through an area. The heat release rate device measures the heat release rate within a volume.

There is often the need to estimate the location of the interface between the hot, smoke-laden upper layer and the cooler lower layer in a burning compartment. Relatively simple fire models, often referred to as two-zone models, compute this quantity directly, along with the average temperature of the upper and lower layers. In a computational fluid dynamics CFD model like FDS, there are not two distinct zones, but rather a continuous profile of temperature. FDS uses an algorithm based on integration along a line to estimate the layer height and the average upper and lower layer temperatures.

A beam detector measures the total obscuration between points. A heat detector measures the temperature at a location using a Response Time Index model. To define a heat detector device, on the Devices menu, click New Heat Detector.

A smoke detector measures obscuration at a point with two characteristic fill-in or “lag” times. To define a smoke detector, on the Devices menu, click New Smoke Detector. Nozzles are very much like sprinklers, only they do not activate based on the standard RTI model. They can be set to activate by custom control logic. Objects can be set to activate or deactivate during the simulation using activation events. Activation events are the control logic system in FDS and can be set on each geometric simulation object e.

PyroSim supports activation events based on time and input devices. Some uses of activation events include:. After selecting an input type and an action, a pattern in sentence form for describing the control logic will appear in the dialog. Some key words and numbers will be drawn in blue and underlined. Any blue text can be clicked to modify the behavior of the specific control. Figure shows the selector popup for objects. Objects are selected by name. Activation controls are stored separately from specific geometric objects.

This makes it possible to bind an object to a control after it has been created. Figure shows the activation control in the object properties dialog for a hole.

Once a control has been bound to an object or objects any objects linked to that control will show a text description of the control in their properties editor. This text will be shown in blue and underlined and can be clicked to edit the activation control. Changes made to the activation control will impact all referencing objects. To create or remove an object at a specific time, select Time for the Input Type in the Activation Controls dialog.

When using time as the input, objects can be created at a specific time, removed at a specific time, or be created and removed periodically throughout the simulation. When performing multiple timed events, the creation and removal and times at which they occur are specified in the table at the bottom of the dialog.

The create and remove events should alternate as time increases. To create or remove some objects based on a device in the model, the device must first have a setpoint enabled.

Once the desired devices have been given a setpoint, they can be used as inputs to the control logic expression. If more than one detector is to be used to activate the objects, the descriptive sentence can be used to decide if the objects should trigger when any, all, or a certain number of the devices activate.

A duct is required for any HVAC system. Note that an HVAC Fan is a class of object, and a single fan definition can be used by any number of ducts.

A given filter can limit the flow of any number of valid species defined in the model. Note that an HVAC Filter is a class of object, and a single filter definition can be referenced by any number of nodes.

Note that an HVAC Aircoil is a class of object, and a single aircoil definition can be used by any number of ducts. See Section 8. In this chapter we describe the simulation output options available in PyroSim. Each of these options is located in the Output menu.

Solid profiles measure quantities e. This output file contains the data necessary to create an animated 2D chart of the quantity as it extends into the object over time.

PyroSim does not currently support displaying this output file. To generate solid profile output, on the Output menu, click Solid Profiles. This data can then be animated and displayed using the 3D Results Figure To generate animated slice planes, either draw them using the drawing tools as described in Section 9.

This data can then be animated and displayed using the 3D Results in several different ways, including volumetric renderings, plotting 2D slices through the data, plotting points, or creating isosurfaces, all in the 3D Results application. Figure shows a volumetric rendering.

To generate animated 3D slices, either draw them using the drawing tools as described in Section 9. Boundary quantities provide a way to visualize output quantities e. This data can be animated and visualized in the 3D Results Figure Since the data applies to all surfaces in the simulation, no geometric data needs to be specified. To generate boundary quantity data, on the Output menu, click Boundary Quantities. In the Animated Boundary Quantities dialog, you can select each quantity you would like to be available for visualization.

Isosurfaces are used to plot the three dimensional contour of gas phase quantities. To generate isosurface data, on the Output menu, click Isosurfaces , In the Animated Isosurfaces dialog, you can select each quantity you would like to be available for visualization. Then you must enter values at which to display that quantity in the Contour Values column. If you enter more than one contour value, each value must be separated by the semi-colon character ;. Once you have finished typing the value, press enter.

Plot3D is a standard file format and, like 3D slices, can be used to display 2D contours, vector plots, and isosurfaces in a volumetric region the 3D Results Figure Each Q file contains data for up to five quantities.

Simulations with multiple meshes have XYZ and Q files for each mesh. The 3D Results will automatically stitch the individual Q files together to animate the results. To quickly select the quantities useful in Pathfinder, including the FED calculation, click the Reset button and click Pathfinder Quantities.

Statistics output is an extension of the devices system. You can insert a statistics gathering device and it will output data about the minimum, maximum, and average value of a particular quantity in one or more mesh. This data can then be viewed in a 2D chart using PyroSim Figure To generate statistics data for some region, on the Output menu, click Statistics. Once a quantity is selected, some combination of the following options is available depending on whether the quantity is gas or solid-phase and what units are output by the quantity:.

This includes setting up simulation parameters, executing single- and multi-threaded simulations, running a remote cluster simulation, and resuming previously stopped simulations. Before running a simulation, FDS simulation parameters should be adjusted to fit the problem. This can include parameters such as simulation time, output quantities, environmental parameters, conversion of angled geometry to blocks, and miscellaneous simulator values.

To edit the simulation parameters, on the Analysis menu, select Simulation Parameters. This shows the simulation parameters dialog. The parameters are split into several categories, with each category on another tab of the dialog.

All time-related values can be entered on the Time tab as shown in Figure The Environment tab enables various ambient environmental properties to be set as shown in Figure A unique aspect of this tab is the specification feature for gravity. Gravity, in each of the X, Y, and Z directions, can be defined as a ramped function.

This allows users to model complex behavior of gravity in tunnel or space applications where spatial or temporal variations in direction may change the magnitude vector. Each ramp can be set to vary as a function of either the position along the X direction, or time.

While the Environment tab provides control over ambient environmental conditions, different temperatures, pressures, and mass fractions of species can be specified in various sub-regions of the model by using Init Regions. This opens the Initial Region dialog as shown in Figure Specify the desired temperature, pressure, or mass fraction of species to override in the region on the General tab and enter the volume parameters on the Geometry tab.

Press OK to create the Init Region. Wind parameters can be specified by checking Configure Wind and then clicking the Edit button. This will open the Wind dialog as shown in Figure The Wind Profile tab provides control over how the wind speed and temperature develops as a function of the elevation.

The Custom Profile parameters provide fine-grained control over the initial wind speed, direction, and velocity and temperature as a function of elevation. The Speed Change over Time tab allows control over the wind velocity as a function of time. While the wind profile determines the base speed at various locations and elevations in the model, the speed change over time parameters provide multipliers that are applied to these values to vary them over time.

The Natural Wind tab provides the ability to allow wind to develop naturally by specifying pressure drops over distance.

This may be useful for modeling transit tunnels. The Simulator tab provides control over the simulator used in FDS. The Radiation tab provides control over radiation parameters used in FDS. PyroSim allows obstructions and holes to be drawn that are not aligned with the solution mesh needed by FDS Figure PyroSim will either do this automatically when the FDS input file is generated, or this can be done manually for individual objects by right-clicking the object and selecting Convert to Blocks.

The Angled Geometry tab of the simulation parameters dialog provides default parameters that control conversion of obstructions and holes into blocks for the FDS input file as shown in Figure As of FDS version 6. OpenMP will automatically be used to utilize multiple processing cores, if available, during the simulation procedure.

These settings are applied to the execution context created by PyroSim and do not alter system environment variables. Once you have created a fire model, you can run the simulation from within PyroSim. FDS actions can be accessed from either the Analysis menu or the main toolbar, as shown in Figure PyroSim will save a copy of the current PyroSim file into this directory and create the following files:.

But some are not so common. First, take a look at these 63 formats in GIS. Then, bookmark it for future reference:. Subscribe to our newsletter:. I would love it if you added the following file formats:. Thank you! Leave a Reply Your email address will not be published. Toggle Menu Close. Search for: Search. All commercial and open source accept shapefile as a GIS format. The three required files are: SHP is the feature geometry.

SHX is the shape index position. DBF is the attribute data. You can optionally include these files but are not completely necessary. PRJ is the projection system metadata. XML is the associated metadata. SBN is the spatial index for optimizing queries. SBX optimizes loading times.

Similar to shapefiles, they require a set of files to represent geographic information and attributes. ID files are index files that link graphical objects to database information. MAP files are the map objects that store geographic information. IND files are index files for the tabular data.

AUX auxiliary files store projections and other information. OVR pyramid files improves performance for raster display. Whereas Band interleaved by pixel BIP assigns pixel values for each band by rows. Finally, Band sequential format BSQ stores separate bands by rows. They generally contain elements such as edges, curves, and annotation text in layers.

Every element plots XY points in a grid. DGN files consist of layers including annotation, points, polylines, polygons, and multipath. They also contain style information ColorIndex and a spatial reference system. Record A stores general characteristics of the DEM such as descriptive name, elevation minimum and maximum, extent boundaries and number of B records.

Record B contains a header and elevation profile. Record C stores the accuracy of the data and is optional. The 3 levels of resolutions contain various cell-spacing resolution: Level 0 spacing is 30 arc second spacing nominally one kilometer Level 1 spacing is 3 arc seconds approximately meters Level 2 spacing is 1 arc second approximately 30 meters. Feature layers are vector layers that can be viewed and edited by users in an organization.

Tile layers are pre-drawn commonly used for basemaps. Scene layers are specific for a collection of three-dimensional data. Map composition files. Once you reopen it, MAP files recreate the map layout as needed for printing. ArcGlobe is a global 3D visualization and analysis environment focusing on larger study areas.

ArcScene is a 3D feature and raster viewer specializing in smaller study area or local scenes. SXD is the extension for ArcScene that saves the scenes view, layers and properties.

Not only do QLR files contain the styling information for a layer, they also point to a referenced layer. STYL files are a set of symbols that can be assigned to symbolize features in a map layout. They often carry a list of icons specific to a theme such as forestry, petroleum or geology. Once you add a STYL file to a map document, map features can obtain any unique symbology as part of the style file.

These conceptual design files buildings, towers, trees, etc can be placed in Google Earth. MIF format are versatile files that allows the exchange of MapInfo files between different geospatial systems. MID retains the attributes as delimited text. Indoor Mapping Data Format is data model which is standard for indoor mapping and venue applications supported by Apple Maps. RVT are proprietary files supported in Autodesk Revit.

When you create a custom toolbox, you can add toolsets and models. For example, you can add Python scripts. Online Dating. In a perfect world, you and your soulmate would bump into each other on the streets of Germany, lock eyes, and fall madly in love the next second.

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Enscape uses ray tracing autodesk revit 2015 operating system unsupported free its real-time rendering, and almost all the autodesk revit 2015 operating system unsupported free that Enscape performs are being handled on the graphics card GPU. For this reason, your computer must at least meet the minimum recommended system requirements autodesk revit 2015 operating system unsupported free out below.

Furthermore, although not a requirement, we do recommend that you use Enscape with dual monitors, as Enscape is optimized to work on a dual monitor setup. Enscape is not provided operatinb a plugin for Revit LT because Revit only fee the addition of third-party plugins in the the full game donald duck pc of the software.

This is a limitation set by Autodesk. On Windows, the Enscape plugin will be installed for all of the syshem listed host applications by default unless otherwise specified by the user during the installation process.

Note: There are conflicts with two other Revit plugins: Colorizer and Techviz. To avoid incompatibilities, please uninstall them before using Enscape. The system requirements to run Enscape, as unspuported as the Standalone Executable files that can be exported from Enscape, syystem identical. It is also читать статью that your internet connection is fast and stable, and that you should use a direct cable connection and avoid using a Wi-fi connection where possible, as this can slow down the Asset Library loading times.

If using Revit, there are known conflicts Прелестно adobe audition 2 keygen free кажется two other Revit plugins: Colorizer and Techviz. Please let us know if you experience any issues when running Enscape under this operating system by submitting feedback via the Enscape Feedback Form.

Enscape should work if your GPU is capable of running the minimum recommended drivers listed below. Although we always advise that you should be running the latest available drivers for your GPU, sometimes the latest available GPU drivers can cause unforeseen issues and in such a case we strongly advise that you rdvit back to the drivers listed here:.

There are plenty of different system configurations and we are working every day to support more of them. Yes No. Here, only the input of your feedback is required. The provision of further data, such as your e-mail address, autodesk revit 2015 operating system unsupported free optional. If you provide further data, such as your e-mail address, we will use this to ask you questions about the feedback, if necessary, and thus to improve our services even more specifically.

The legal basis for data processing is your consent Art. The granting feee consent is voluntary and is given when providing the optional email address which can be revoked at any time with effect for the future. Your data will be deleted when the processing is no longer necessary aufodesk fulfill the purpose, but at the latest with the revocation of your consent. System Requirements. The Enscape 3. If that software is not present the installer will prompt you to download and install whatever is missing from your system.

NET Framework 4. Only docking stations that support accelerated graphics will work with Enscape. Recommended Graphics Tree. Enscape v3. System Support. Follow Us on. Enscape Newsletter. Start Enscape. Link Views to Settings Presets. Webinar Alert. Windows 10 or higher Enscape will also pperating where Windows 10 is installed on certain Intel 2051 via Bootcamp. Additional Software Requirements. The Enscape installer will check for the presence of additional software required to run Enscape.

 
 

Autodesk revit 2015 operating system unsupported free

 

It is also recommended that your internet connection is fast and stable, and that you should use a direct cable connection and avoid using a Wi-fi connection where possible, as this can slow down the Asset Library loading times.

If using Revit, there are known conflicts with two other Revit plugins: Colorizer and Techviz. Please let us know if you experience any issues when running Enscape under this operating system by submitting feedback via the Enscape Feedback Form.

Enscape should work if your GPU is capable of running the minimum recommended drivers listed below. Although we always advise that you should be running the latest available drivers for your GPU, sometimes the latest available GPU drivers can cause unforeseen issues and in such a case we strongly advise that you roll back to the drivers listed here:.

There are plenty of different system configurations and we are working every day to support more of them. Yes No. Here, only the input of your feedback is required. The provision of further data, such as your e-mail address, is optional. By default, all solid objects and vents are inert, with a temperature that is fixed at the ambient temperature set in the Simulation Parameters dialog. In addition to defining heat conduction in a solid, surfaces can also be used to define a burner, specify the ignition temperature for an object, give a vent a supply velocity, and set the many other properties supported by FDS.

To create, modify, and delete surfaces, you can use the Edit Surfaces dialog. The dialog in Figure 35 shows the dialog being used to edit an upholstery surface. These surfaces cannot be changed and are present in every analysis. This surface remains fixed at the ambient temperature. This surface is used only for vents on the exterior mesh boundary. It is intended to be applied to an entire mesh boundary to symmetrically double the size of the domain.

PyroSim aids the user by organizing the surface options into logical types, such as a burner to define a simple fire or a layered surface to represent a solid, heat conducting wall. The Edit Surfaces dialog helps define a surface type with a set of tabs. Each tab provides a collection of input fields and settings for the user to customize that surface type.

Air leak surfaces can be used to create a permeable barrier between two pressure zones, defined by the Leak Path in the Edit Surfaces dialog. The leak area is defined by the zones selected. It allows you to customize the description, color, and texture of the inert surface described in Reserved Surfaces.

Exhaust surfaces can be used to remove gas from the simulation domain. The specification of their air movement parameters is identical to that of a supply surface, but instead of the velocity or flux driving air into the domain, they are pulling air out. Exhaust surfaces do not have the option to apply injection or geometry properties. Tabs: Advanced , Air Flow , Thermal. The General Surface type is a hybrid between the Burner and Supply surface types. Adding a little more flexibility than either of them individually.

This surface type represents a radiative heat source. The options are identical to the options for a burner without the heat release options. If the surface temperature is less than the ambient temperature, the surface will remove heat from the surrounding gases. Layered surfaces are composed of one or more material definitions. Materials include solid and liquid substances such as concrete, pine, and ethanol. For more information about materials and how they can be specified in PyroSim, please refer to Chapter 6.

This type of surface is ideal for walls and other objects that are composed of real-world materials. This surface type can also be used to inject extra non-reactive species into the simulation. This surface represents a vent that injects air into the simulation domain.

The temperature of the air injected by supply vents can be controlled using settings on the thermal tab. Species Injection options are available if the Specify Mass Flux of Individual Species option in the Air Flow group is selected and there are extra, non-reactive species present in the simulation. Each tab of the Edit Surfaces dialog provides a set of inputs and settings that can be used to build a custom surface type as listed in Section 7.

The following sections describe the parameters on each tab and are listed in alphabetical order, not the order they might appear for a surface type. The reaction used to model a given surface can either be taken from the material specifications, or given explicitly by the surface. Manually specifying the parameters will produce a surface similar to a burner. You can inject extra non-reactive species into the simulation using the species injection options.

To use these options, you must first specify species using the Edit Species dialog. You can add textures to surfaces to increase the realism of your model. This can be done through the use of Appearance objects. An Appearance defines how the surfaces of objects will appear and can have colors or textures applied to them. Some default appearances are provided or you can import your own.

The Room Fire example demonstrates using a wood texture for a pine floor and hanging a picture on a wall. Your textures will be automatically displayed in PyroSim. Appearances will be shown on obstructions and vents when the View Mode is either Realistic or Realistic with Outlines.

Appearances can also be viewed by going to the Model menu and selecting Edit Appearances. Geometry can either be created through dialogs or by using the drafting tools in the 2D or 3D views as discussed in Chapter 9. The user can also organize the model by creating floors and groups. In addition, the user can assign background images to floors to aid in drafting. Obstructions are the fundamental geometric representation in FDS. In FDS, obstructions are rectangular, axis-aligned solids defined by two points.

Surface properties are assigned to each face of the obstruction. In PyroSim, obstructions can take any shape, have any number of faces, and have different surfaces applied to each face. At the time of simulation, PyroSim will automatically convert the obstructions to axis-aligned blocks required by FDS as discussed in Section To create a new obstruction, either use an obstruction drawing tool as discussed in Chapter 9 or on the Model menu, click New Obstruction.

This tab of the obstruction panel presents all options other than those controlling geometry and surface information. This includes activation events conditions that can cause the obstruction to be added or removed from the simulation and miscellaneous options such as color and smoothing. This tab allows you to enter the min and max coordinates of the object. For more elaborate geometry, such as slabs, this tab may contain a table of points and extrusion options.

Extrusion is the mechanism PyroSim uses to extend 2-dimensional objects along a vector – creating a 3-dimensional object. The Surfaces tab can be used to specify one surface to be used for all six sides of the object or assign surfaces on a per-face basis. Alternately, surfaces can be “painted” using the Paint Tool as discussed in Section 9. Holes are used to carve negative spaces out of obstructions. In FDS, holes are similar to obstructions in that they are defined as axis-aligned blocks.

Like obstructions in PyroSim, however, holes can be any shape. PyroSim automatically converts them to blocks in the FDS input file. PyroSim treats holes as first-class objects that can be selected, deleted, and have other operations performed on them like obstructions as discussed in Chapter In the 3D and 2D views, holes appear as transparent objects.

In addition, for display purposes only, PyroSim carves holes out of obstructions as shown in Figure For complex holes or obstructions or large holes that span many obstructions, this process may be slow. In these cases, hole-cutting display can be turned off by going to the View menu and deselecting Cut Holes From Obstructions.

By default, all obstructions allow holes to be cut from them. To prevent an obstruction from allowing holes, edit the properties of the obstruction as discussed in Section 8. There are various rules that govern how holes are written to the FDS input file. In general, if the PYROGEOM file is enabled, a hole has control logic, and the hole intersects obstructions, the hole will be pre-subtracted from obstructions before the obstructions are converted into blocks, and the holes will be excluded from the FDS file.

If the above conditions do not hold, the holes are converted to blocks similarly to obstructions and are written as HOLE records. For more information, see Section Holes can either be drawn as discussed in Chapter 9 or can be created by opening the Model menu and clicking New Hole. Like obstructions, holes can also be activated as discussed in Chapter Holes can also have a color applied.

When starting a simulation or exporting an FDS file for some models, the user may receive the following message as shown in Figure 42 : “PyroSim has detected a hole touching a mesh boundary, which may cause cutting problems in FDS. Would you like to slightly expand these types of holes? FDS currently has an issue where it will not fully cut a hole from an obstruction if both the hole and obstruction touch a mesh boundary at the same location. Instead, FDS leaves a thin obstruction along the mesh boundary.

Figure 43 shows a model in PyroSim that can lead this problem. In this model, both the hole and the obstruction touch the bottom of the mesh, and the hole should cut all the way through the mesh. Figure 44 shows this model in FDS where the hole has not been punched all the way through the obstruction.

PyroSim detects potential cases where this might happen and prompts the user with the Expand Boundary Holes dialog. This ensures the hole is properly cut all the way through the obstruction as shown in Figure If the user chooses not to expand these types of holes the No option , the hole will be written exactly as specified and may lead to the thin obstruction problem.

Vents have general usage in FDS to describe a 2D rectangular patch on the surface of a solid obstruction or on a mesh boundary as shown in Figure A vent may have a different surface applied to it than the rest of the obstruction to which it is attached.

Taken literally, a vent can be used to model components of the ventilation system in a building, like a diffuser or a return. In these cases, the vent coordinates form a plane on a solid surface forming the boundary of the duct. No holes need to be created through the solid; it is assumed that air is pushed out of or sucked into duct work within the wall. You can also use vents as a means of applying a particular boundary condition to a rectangular patch on a solid surface.

A fire, for example, is usually created by first generating a solid obstruction and then specifying a vent somewhere on one of the faces of the solid with the characteristics of the thermal and combustion properties of the fuel. For more information on these types, see Chapter 7. Vents can either be drawn as discussed in Chapter 9 or be created by opening the Model menu and clicking New Vent.

This will open the New Vent dialog as shown in Figure With the exception of Fire Spread , the other properties are similar to obstructions. Fire Spread can be specified on vents using a burner surface Chapter 7. This option simulates a radially spreading fire at the vent. A vent can also be given radial properties. Groups can be used to hierarchically organize the model.

Groups can only be seen in the Navigation View. The “Model” is the base group. Users can nest groups inside other groups, allowing the user to work with thousands of objects in an organized way. When the user performs an action on a group, that action will be propagated to all objects in the group.

Both of these actions will show the Create Group dialog as shown in Figure This dialog allows the user to choose the parent group and name of the new group. In the Change Group dialog shown in Figure 52 , select the desired group. If a new group is desired, select New Subgroup and specify a name. If this is chosen, a new group will be created under the specified existing group, and the selected objects will be moved to this new group.

All newly drawn objects will be added to this group. Floors are used in PyroSim to quickly apply clipping filters to the scene to only show a portion of the model. They are also used to initialize the properties of drawing tools so that they draw at the proper Z location. An example of floor clipping is shown in Floor clipping , where Figure 54 shows all floors and Figure 55 shows a single floor.

This will display the Manage Floors dialog shown in Figure To add a new floor, click the Add Floor. This will show the New Floor dialog shown in Figure In this dialog, if the user enters a new slab thickness , the elevation will be automatically updated so the new floor does not overlap the others unless the user enters a specific value for the elevation.

In addition, unless the user enters a specific name, a name will be automatically generated based on the elevation. Press OK again in the Manage Floors dialog to commit the changes. By default, the model contains one floor at elevation 0. Using these values leaves a distance of 3. Once the floors have been defined, the user can filter the display to show either a single floor or all floors as shown in Figure 7.

For most views, the Z clipping range for a particular floor is from the floor elevation minus slab thickness to floor elevation plus wall height. The Z clipping range works differently for the top camera of the 2D view, however. In this view, the clipping is from the elevation of the floor BELOW to the elevation plus wall height of the current floor. This allows the geometry on the floor below to be snapped to in drawing geometry for the current floor.

For this to be useful, however, the user may want to use wireframe rendering. Each floor can have an associated background image. To add a background image to a floor, go to the 2D or 3D View, select a specific floor, then click the Configure Background Image button.

Alternately click the Define Floor Locations button, , and then in the Background Image column, select the Edit button. This will display the Configure Background Image dialog shown in Figure Now, in the 3D or 2D views, when the user displays a specific floor, the background image for that floor will be displayed.

To turn off the background images, go to the 2D or 3D View, and click the Show Background Images button next to the floors drop-down. While not a full-fledged drafting application, PyroSim does provide useful drawing features, including the following:. PyroSim provides several drawing and editing tools. These tools are located on the drawing toolbar at the left side of the 3D and 2D Views as shown in Figure Some of these tools allow a user to create and edit objects such as slabs and walls that are not constrained to the FDS mesh.

In these cases, PyroSim will automatically convert the shapes to mesh-based blocks when the FDS input file is created. For information on block conversion, see Section To begin drawing or editing with a tool, the user can single-click the tool from the tool bar. The button will show a green dot when pinned. Every time the same tool button is clicked, the pinned state of that tool will be toggled, so clicking the button again after pinning will disable pinning.

This will also cancel pinning and will revert back to the last-used navigation tool. Each tool has a set of properties that can be modified by clicking the Tool Properties button located at the bottom of the toolbar after selecting the desired tool.

Options such as elevation, height, surface, and color can all be edited in the Tool Properties dialog. In addition to the tool properties, each tool also has additional quick actions. To show these actions, start the desired tool and then right-click in the 2D or 3D View. This opens a context menu with the quick actions. Figure 60 shows an example of the quick action menu for the wall tool. This menu allows the user to perform actions specific to the tool, such as closing a polygon, picking a surface, setting wall alignment, accessing the tool properties, etc.

Snapping is one way to precisely draw and edit objects. It is the process of finding some element in the scene, such as a vertex or edge close to the cursor, and snapping the cursor to that element like a magnet.

In PyroSim, snapping can be performed against the solution meshes, objects in the model, and orthographic constraints. The 2D View additionally provides a sketch grid and polar angle constraints. If a snap point is found, an indicator dot shown in Figure 61 will appear at the snap point. By default, snapping is enabled. If there are any solution meshes in the model see Chapter 5 , PyroSim can snap to them during drawing and editing.

For each mesh that is visible, PyroSim can snap to its boundary edges, boundary faces, grid lines, and the intersections of the grid lines, depending on which mesh display filters are active as discussed in Section 2. PyroSim also provides a user-defined drawing grid, or sketch grid, in the 2D View as shown in Figure When a new model is created, the sketch grid is visible and can be snapped to in the 2D view.

The default spacing for the divisions is 1 m, but can be changed by going to the View menu and clicking Set Sketch Grid Spacing. Once the user has created a solution mesh, PyroSim will automatically switch to solution mesh snapping and disable sketch grid snapping. In the 2D View , PyroSim will only snap to the sketch grid or visible solution meshes.

To disable grid snapping altogether, on the View menu choose Disable Grid Snapping. There are three basic categories of geometry that can be snapped to on objects: faces , edges , and vertices. Objects can have any combination of types. If there are multiple types close to the cursor, PyroSim will give vertices precedence over edges and edges precedence over faces. Constraints are dynamic snapping lines that are only visible when the cursor is near them. They appear as infinite dotted lines as shown in Figure If a constraint is currently being snapped to, that constraint can be locked by holding SHIFT on the keyboard.

While holding SHIFT , a second dotted line will extend from the cursor to the locked constraint the first dotted line. This is useful for lining up objects along a constraint with other objects. For instance, in Figure 64 , a box already exists in the model. A second slab is being drawn such that the third point of the slab lines up with the right side of the first box. This was done as follows:.

This window shows the value used to determine the next point or value for the current tool. In this figure the value is the Distance from the previous point along the vector from the previous point to the current cursor location.

For other tools, this value may be angle or relative offset, etc. The value is editable if the status bar at the bottom of the 3D or 2D View indicates it is. If the user starts typing, the popup window will be replaced with an editing window as shown in Figure If the user presses ESC instead, the keyboard entry will be cancelled.

Pressing TAB cycles through alternate input methods to determine the next value. For instance, pressing TAB with the wall tool allows the user to enter a relative offset from the last point instead of a distance. Pressing TAB a second time allows the user to enter an absolute position for the next point, and pressing TAB a third time will cycle back to the distance input. Precise keyboard entry may be easiest for some users when using the multi-click mode of drawing rather than using the click-drag mode.

Using multi-click allows both hands to be used to type as opposed to click-drag, which requires one hand to remain on the mouse. There are some key differences between drawing in the 2D and 3D Views. The 2D View is useful when drawing should be restricted to one pre-defined plane. It is also useful for lining up objects along the X, Y, or Z axes.

The 3D View is useful when an object such as a vent or solid-phase device needs to be snapped to the face of an obstruction or vent or if the user would like to build objects by stacking them on top of one another. When drawing in the 2D View , the drawing will always take place in the drawing plane specified in the tool properties, and snapping is only performed in the local X and Y dimensions.

The local Z value will remain true to the drawing plane. In addition, if a tool has some sort of height or depth property, the tool will also remain true to that value. While snapping was used to partially align the objects, they both remain in the Z planes specified in their tool properties shown in the rotated view Figure The 3D View uses snapping in all three dimensions, causing tool properties to be interpreted more loosely.

The drawing plane and depth properties for a drawn object are context-sensitive in the 3D View. When using tools such as the slab tool, the first clicked point determines the drawing plane. If, on this first click, another object is snapped to, the drawing plane is set at the Z location of that snap point.

This 3D snapping feature of the 3D View is useful for drawing vents on obstructions and attaching solid-phase devices to obstructions as shown in Figure The 3D snapping feature is also useful for stacking objects, as shown in Figure In this figure, the drawing plane was never changed. All the objects were stacked on top of each other using snapping. While stacking can be useful for obstructions, a user must be more careful when drawing holes in the 3D View.

For instance, with the slab hole tool and block hole tool , the user will need to change the extrusion direction to properly direct the hole into the obstruction. For instance, if the user draws a slab obstruction in the 3D View and then draws a slab hole while snapping to the obstruction, the hole will be stacked on top of the obstruction without cutting a hole as shown in Figure This will result in a proper hole as shown in Figure This is not a problem in the 2D View since it always uses the drawing plane set in the tool properties instead of stacking the objects.

Once the drawing plane for a tool has been established by the first click, the tool can still determine the next points by snapping to objects in another plane.

In this case, the snapped points will be projected to the drawing plane for the current tool. A dotted line will show how the snapped point was projected to the plane.

There are four tools that can draw obstructions, for more information on obstructions, see Section 8. Slab Obstruction Tool: Used to draw the slab for a floor. Wall Obstruction Tool : Used to draw a wall. Block Obstruction Tool: Used to fill grid cells with obstructions. Room Tool: Used to draw a rectangular room.

For all the obstruction tools, the tool properties dialog will appear similar to that in Figure The only section of the dialog that will change between these tools is the geometry, such as Z Location and Thickness. All other properties, including name, surface, color, and obstruction flags appear in all obstruction dialogs. These parameters control the properties that will be applied to the next drawn obstruction.

The surface and color of the next obstruction can also be set via the right-click menu for the tool. A slab is an extruded polygonal object as shown in Figure 75 that can be used to draw the slab for a floor in a building. The slab obstruction tool adds two additional properties to the tool dialog for obstructions:. The wall obstruction tool can be used to draw multi-segmented walls as shown in Figure In this figure, there is only one wall.

The user specifies a path along the floor from which the wall is extruded up. The wall can be aligned to the left, right, or center of the drawn path. The alignment of the wall can be controlled through the right-click menu for the tool or can be cycled by pressing the CTRL key on the keyboard. If the first clicked point is clicked again after drawing at least two segments or Close is chosen from the right-click menu, the tool will draw one last segment from the last clicked point to the first point and finish.

Alternately, the wall can be ended at the last clicked point by choosing Finish from the right-click menu. The Block Obstruction Tool can be used to quickly fill grid cells with blocks as shown in Figure 80 or place a block with a single click.

In addition, the extrusion direction for the block can be toggled by pressing CTRL on the keyboard or through the right-click menu for the tool. The Room Tool can be used to draw a rectangular room using one closed wall as shown in Figure The room tool contains the same properties as the wall obstruction tool. There are three tools that can draw holes, for more information on holes, see Section 8.

Slab Hole Tool: Used to draw a hole in a floor slab. Wall Hole Tool : Used to draw an opening in a wall, such as for a doorway or window. Block Hole Tool: Used to fill grid cells with holes. All these tools work the same as their obstruction counterparts, but they do not have the properties specific to obstructions, such as the surface or obstruction flags. There is only one tool for drawing vents for more information on vents, see Section 8.

PyroSim only allows vents in an X, Y, or Z plane. Vents cannot currently be drawn off-axis like walls can. Vents also must be attached to solid obstructions at least one grid cell thick.

This is easily accomplished by drawing the vent in the 3D View see Section 9. Solution meshes can be easily split into two or more sub-meshes by using the Mesh Splitter Tool. PyroSim allows point devices to be drawn with the Device Tool , for more information on devices, Chapter This makes it trivial to attach a solid-phase device to an obstruction.

We need a copy of the tax exempt certificate to refund the tax if already paid. When your purchase is completed you will get an email with the DST Converter download.

The license is perpetual as a minimum for the version available when purchased and support is included. If you too have a need for any of these wishes please contact us so we know how big the need for it is and can prioritize accordingly. You can renumber hundreds of sheets within seconds. The investment is well worth it. I actually bought a personal license for his Sheet Set Property Editor that makes backups of your DST file each time you open one in the application.

If you use Sheet Set Manager for your projects, I’d recommend getting yourself a license as well. It’s so helpful. If you deal with Sheet Sets often, especially large lets, this product will save you time if you have to renumber a set i. It took me about 20 seconds to renumber a page plan set. I have mentioned this to management several times.

The program and the support is above and beyond. The SSM speeds up productivity, but the SSM Properties Editor makes it feasible considering you can have titles 64 characters long and longer, plus special characters. The ability to change properties on multiple sheets at once is something that really makes this worth having. I was able to change 45 sheet title blocks in a matter of minutes.

I only needed to use the Prop editor once, but it worked ‘exactly like it said on the tin’. Why don’t Autodesk do this already? Great product. I’m editing custom sheet set data regarding drawn-by and checked by and lot of other data for hundreds of sheets in seconds while it took me days to do it – quote on AUGI.

Thanks for your support Jimmy. We managed to rename the Layouts as well. This app deserves 10 stars unfortunately I can only give 5. Best AutoCAD app available out there. Really wish I would have had this program several times in my career. It would have saved me a ton of work. Huge time saver I haven’t done extensive testing on this app yet but it’s already saved me tons of work. Templates are great but there are simply times when you need to “retrofit” elements to existing sheet sets. I strongly recommend it.

This initiation was overall excepted well, however one of the few complaints I have received is the inability of editing multiple drawing often in excess of drawings Titleblock information SSM Titleblock Fields. The main comment was Dating Tips. Register Login Language: English en. Register to contact people from your country living in Germany just like you! Dating site for Expats in Germany Finding love is a challenging quest even in your home country. Online dating guide for expats Living in Germany is an incredible opportunity to rediscover and reinvent yourself, including the romantic side of your life.

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If you have more than one computer and you are the only user of the application one license is enough. The network license system is available at no extra cost and normally most useful for companies with quite many licenses. The network license is priced the same but you basically need a license per user anyway as the license will be locked to that user for 4 weeks after last usage.

Reason is that this app is not such that you keep it running for an extended time. But the network license helps when you have many licenses as each computer does not need to be activated through us.

There is volume discount available with purchase of multiple licenses. If your company is tax exempt note that BlueSnap does not currently offer a way to prevent tax from being charged on orders. We need a copy of the tax exempt certificate to refund the tax if already paid. When your purchase is completed you will get an email with the DST Converter download.

The license is perpetual as a minimum for the version available when purchased and support is included. If you too have a need for any of these wishes please contact us so we know how big the need for it is and can prioritize accordingly. You can renumber hundreds of sheets within seconds. The investment is well worth it. I actually bought a personal license for his Sheet Set Property Editor that makes backups of your DST file each time you open one in the application.

If you use Sheet Set Manager for your projects, I’d recommend getting yourself a license as well. It’s so helpful. If you deal with Sheet Sets often, especially large lets, this product will save you time if you have to renumber a set i. It took me about 20 seconds to renumber a page plan set. I have mentioned this to management several times.

The program and the support is above and beyond. The SSM speeds up productivity, but the SSM Properties Editor makes it feasible considering you can have titles 64 characters long and longer, plus special characters. The ability to change properties on multiple sheets at once is something that really makes this worth having.

I was able to change 45 sheet title blocks in a matter of minutes. I only needed to use the Prop editor once, but it worked ‘exactly like it said on the tin’. Why don’t Autodesk do this already? Great product. I’m editing custom sheet set data regarding drawn-by and checked by and lot of other data for hundreds of sheets in seconds while it took me days to do it – quote on AUGI. Thanks for your support Jimmy.

We managed to rename the Layouts as well. This app deserves 10 stars unfortunately I can only give 5. Best AutoCAD app available out there. GIS is truly one of the most diverse and expanding technologies, as shown by the plethora of GIS formats in the industry.

Thanks for the great list! What about layer style formats? Like SLD for instance. ADF, however like shapes and filegdb there is more than one file on disk for a single raster. CPG describe the encoding applied to create the shapefile. Where are MapInfo file formats? Since when is Postgis a file format? Thanks for the overview but I want to correct two points. Your email address will not be published.

Skip to content. Some geospatial data formats are common. But some are not so common. First, take a look at these 63 formats in GIS. Then, bookmark it for future reference:. Subscribe to our newsletter:. I would love it if you added the following file formats:. Thank you! Leave a Reply Your email address will not be published. Toggle Menu Close. Search for: Search. All commercial and open source accept shapefile as a GIS format.

The three required files are: SHP is the feature geometry. SHX is the shape index position. DBF is the attribute data. You can optionally include these files but are not completely necessary.

PRJ is the projection system metadata. XML is the associated metadata. SBN is the spatial index for optimizing queries.

SBX optimizes loading times. Similar to shapefiles, they require a set of files to represent geographic information and attributes. ID files are index files that link graphical objects to database information.

MAP files are the map objects that store geographic information. IND files are index files for the tabular data. AUX auxiliary files store projections and other information. OVR pyramid files improves performance for raster display. Whereas Band interleaved by pixel BIP assigns pixel values for each band by rows. Finally, Band sequential format BSQ stores separate bands by rows. They generally contain elements such as edges, curves, and annotation text in layers.

Every element plots XY points in a grid. DGN files consist of layers including annotation, points, polylines, polygons, and multipath. They also contain style information ColorIndex and a spatial reference system. Record A stores general characteristics of the DEM such as descriptive name, elevation minimum and maximum, extent boundaries and number of B records.

Record B contains a header and elevation profile. Record C stores the accuracy of the data and is optional. The 3 levels of resolutions contain various cell-spacing resolution: Level 0 spacing is 30 arc second spacing nominally one kilometer Level 1 spacing is 3 arc seconds approximately meters Level 2 spacing is 1 arc second approximately 30 meters.

Feature layers are vector layers that can be viewed and edited by users in an organization. Tile layers are pre-drawn commonly used for basemaps.

Scene layers are specific for a collection of three-dimensional data. Map composition files. Once you reopen it, MAP files recreate the map layout as needed for printing. ArcGlobe is a global 3D visualization and analysis environment focusing on larger study areas.

ArcScene is a 3D feature and raster viewer specializing in smaller study area or local scenes. In a perfect world, you and your soulmate would bump into each other on the streets of Germany, lock eyes, and fall madly in love the next second.

Dating Profile. Is online dating easier for single female expats in Germany than for their male counterparts? Dating Tips. Register Login Language: English en. Register to contact people from your country living in Germany just like you! Some default appearances are provided or you can import your own. The Room Fire example demonstrates using a wood texture for a pine floor and hanging a picture on a wall.

Your textures will be automatically displayed in PyroSim. Appearances will be shown on obstructions and vents when the View Mode is either Realistic or Realistic with Outlines.

Appearances can also be viewed by going to the Model menu and selecting Edit Appearances. Geometry can either be created through dialogs or by using the drafting tools in the 2D or 3D views as discussed in Chapter 9. The user can also organize the model by creating floors and groups. In addition, the user can assign background images to floors to aid in drafting. Obstructions are the fundamental geometric representation in FDS. In FDS, obstructions are rectangular, axis-aligned solids defined by two points.

Surface properties are assigned to each face of the obstruction. In PyroSim, obstructions can take any shape, have any number of faces, and have different surfaces applied to each face. At the time of simulation, PyroSim will automatically convert the obstructions to axis-aligned blocks required by FDS as discussed in Section To create a new obstruction, either use an obstruction drawing tool as discussed in Chapter 9 or on the Model menu, click New Obstruction.

This tab of the obstruction panel presents all options other than those controlling geometry and surface information. This includes activation events conditions that can cause the obstruction to be added or removed from the simulation and miscellaneous options such as color and smoothing. This tab allows you to enter the min and max coordinates of the object.

For more elaborate geometry, such as slabs, this tab may contain a table of points and extrusion options. Extrusion is the mechanism PyroSim uses to extend 2-dimensional objects along a vector – creating a 3-dimensional object. The Surfaces tab can be used to specify one surface to be used for all six sides of the object or assign surfaces on a per-face basis.

Alternately, surfaces can be “painted” using the Paint Tool as discussed in Section 9. Holes are used to carve negative spaces out of obstructions. In FDS, holes are similar to obstructions in that they are defined as axis-aligned blocks. Like obstructions in PyroSim, however, holes can be any shape. PyroSim automatically converts them to blocks in the FDS input file.

PyroSim treats holes as first-class objects that can be selected, deleted, and have other operations performed on them like obstructions as discussed in Chapter In the 3D and 2D views, holes appear as transparent objects. In addition, for display purposes only, PyroSim carves holes out of obstructions as shown in Figure For complex holes or obstructions or large holes that span many obstructions, this process may be slow.

In these cases, hole-cutting display can be turned off by going to the View menu and deselecting Cut Holes From Obstructions. By default, all obstructions allow holes to be cut from them. To prevent an obstruction from allowing holes, edit the properties of the obstruction as discussed in Section 8.

There are various rules that govern how holes are written to the FDS input file. In general, if the PYROGEOM file is enabled, a hole has control logic, and the hole intersects obstructions, the hole will be pre-subtracted from obstructions before the obstructions are converted into blocks, and the holes will be excluded from the FDS file. If the above conditions do not hold, the holes are converted to blocks similarly to obstructions and are written as HOLE records.

For more information, see Section Holes can either be drawn as discussed in Chapter 9 or can be created by opening the Model menu and clicking New Hole. Like obstructions, holes can also be activated as discussed in Chapter Holes can also have a color applied.

When starting a simulation or exporting an FDS file for some models, the user may receive the following message as shown in Figure 42 : “PyroSim has detected a hole touching a mesh boundary, which may cause cutting problems in FDS.

Would you like to slightly expand these types of holes? FDS currently has an issue where it will not fully cut a hole from an obstruction if both the hole and obstruction touch a mesh boundary at the same location. Instead, FDS leaves a thin obstruction along the mesh boundary. Figure 43 shows a model in PyroSim that can lead this problem.

In this model, both the hole and the obstruction touch the bottom of the mesh, and the hole should cut all the way through the mesh. Figure 44 shows this model in FDS where the hole has not been punched all the way through the obstruction. PyroSim detects potential cases where this might happen and prompts the user with the Expand Boundary Holes dialog.

This ensures the hole is properly cut all the way through the obstruction as shown in Figure If the user chooses not to expand these types of holes the No option , the hole will be written exactly as specified and may lead to the thin obstruction problem. Vents have general usage in FDS to describe a 2D rectangular patch on the surface of a solid obstruction or on a mesh boundary as shown in Figure A vent may have a different surface applied to it than the rest of the obstruction to which it is attached.

Taken literally, a vent can be used to model components of the ventilation system in a building, like a diffuser or a return. In these cases, the vent coordinates form a plane on a solid surface forming the boundary of the duct.

No holes need to be created through the solid; it is assumed that air is pushed out of or sucked into duct work within the wall. You can also use vents as a means of applying a particular boundary condition to a rectangular patch on a solid surface.

A fire, for example, is usually created by first generating a solid obstruction and then specifying a vent somewhere on one of the faces of the solid with the characteristics of the thermal and combustion properties of the fuel. For more information on these types, see Chapter 7. Vents can either be drawn as discussed in Chapter 9 or be created by opening the Model menu and clicking New Vent.

This will open the New Vent dialog as shown in Figure With the exception of Fire Spread , the other properties are similar to obstructions. Fire Spread can be specified on vents using a burner surface Chapter 7. This option simulates a radially spreading fire at the vent.

A vent can also be given radial properties. Groups can be used to hierarchically organize the model. Groups can only be seen in the Navigation View. The “Model” is the base group. Users can nest groups inside other groups, allowing the user to work with thousands of objects in an organized way. When the user performs an action on a group, that action will be propagated to all objects in the group. Both of these actions will show the Create Group dialog as shown in Figure This dialog allows the user to choose the parent group and name of the new group.

In the Change Group dialog shown in Figure 52 , select the desired group. If a new group is desired, select New Subgroup and specify a name. If this is chosen, a new group will be created under the specified existing group, and the selected objects will be moved to this new group.

All newly drawn objects will be added to this group. Floors are used in PyroSim to quickly apply clipping filters to the scene to only show a portion of the model. They are also used to initialize the properties of drawing tools so that they draw at the proper Z location. An example of floor clipping is shown in Floor clipping , where Figure 54 shows all floors and Figure 55 shows a single floor. This will display the Manage Floors dialog shown in Figure To add a new floor, click the Add Floor.

This will show the New Floor dialog shown in Figure In this dialog, if the user enters a new slab thickness , the elevation will be automatically updated so the new floor does not overlap the others unless the user enters a specific value for the elevation. In addition, unless the user enters a specific name, a name will be automatically generated based on the elevation.

Press OK again in the Manage Floors dialog to commit the changes. By default, the model contains one floor at elevation 0. Using these values leaves a distance of 3. Once the floors have been defined, the user can filter the display to show either a single floor or all floors as shown in Figure 7. For most views, the Z clipping range for a particular floor is from the floor elevation minus slab thickness to floor elevation plus wall height.

The Z clipping range works differently for the top camera of the 2D view, however. In this view, the clipping is from the elevation of the floor BELOW to the elevation plus wall height of the current floor.

This allows the geometry on the floor below to be snapped to in drawing geometry for the current floor. For this to be useful, however, the user may want to use wireframe rendering. Each floor can have an associated background image. To add a background image to a floor, go to the 2D or 3D View, select a specific floor, then click the Configure Background Image button.

Alternately click the Define Floor Locations button, , and then in the Background Image column, select the Edit button. This will display the Configure Background Image dialog shown in Figure Now, in the 3D or 2D views, when the user displays a specific floor, the background image for that floor will be displayed.

To turn off the background images, go to the 2D or 3D View, and click the Show Background Images button next to the floors drop-down. While not a full-fledged drafting application, PyroSim does provide useful drawing features, including the following:.

PyroSim provides several drawing and editing tools. These tools are located on the drawing toolbar at the left side of the 3D and 2D Views as shown in Figure Some of these tools allow a user to create and edit objects such as slabs and walls that are not constrained to the FDS mesh.

In these cases, PyroSim will automatically convert the shapes to mesh-based blocks when the FDS input file is created. For information on block conversion, see Section To begin drawing or editing with a tool, the user can single-click the tool from the tool bar.

The button will show a green dot when pinned. Every time the same tool button is clicked, the pinned state of that tool will be toggled, so clicking the button again after pinning will disable pinning. This will also cancel pinning and will revert back to the last-used navigation tool.

Each tool has a set of properties that can be modified by clicking the Tool Properties button located at the bottom of the toolbar after selecting the desired tool. Options such as elevation, height, surface, and color can all be edited in the Tool Properties dialog. In addition to the tool properties, each tool also has additional quick actions. To show these actions, start the desired tool and then right-click in the 2D or 3D View.

This opens a context menu with the quick actions. Figure 60 shows an example of the quick action menu for the wall tool.

This menu allows the user to perform actions specific to the tool, such as closing a polygon, picking a surface, setting wall alignment, accessing the tool properties, etc. Snapping is one way to precisely draw and edit objects. It is the process of finding some element in the scene, such as a vertex or edge close to the cursor, and snapping the cursor to that element like a magnet. In PyroSim, snapping can be performed against the solution meshes, objects in the model, and orthographic constraints.

The 2D View additionally provides a sketch grid and polar angle constraints. If a snap point is found, an indicator dot shown in Figure 61 will appear at the snap point. By default, snapping is enabled. If there are any solution meshes in the model see Chapter 5 , PyroSim can snap to them during drawing and editing.

For each mesh that is visible, PyroSim can snap to its boundary edges, boundary faces, grid lines, and the intersections of the grid lines, depending on which mesh display filters are active as discussed in Section 2. PyroSim also provides a user-defined drawing grid, or sketch grid, in the 2D View as shown in Figure When a new model is created, the sketch grid is visible and can be snapped to in the 2D view.

The default spacing for the divisions is 1 m, but can be changed by going to the View menu and clicking Set Sketch Grid Spacing. Once the user has created a solution mesh, PyroSim will automatically switch to solution mesh snapping and disable sketch grid snapping. In the 2D View , PyroSim will only snap to the sketch grid or visible solution meshes. To disable grid snapping altogether, on the View menu choose Disable Grid Snapping.

There are three basic categories of geometry that can be snapped to on objects: faces , edges , and vertices. Objects can have any combination of types. If there are multiple types close to the cursor, PyroSim will give vertices precedence over edges and edges precedence over faces.

Constraints are dynamic snapping lines that are only visible when the cursor is near them. They appear as infinite dotted lines as shown in Figure If a constraint is currently being snapped to, that constraint can be locked by holding SHIFT on the keyboard.

While holding SHIFT , a second dotted line will extend from the cursor to the locked constraint the first dotted line. This is useful for lining up objects along a constraint with other objects. For instance, in Figure 64 , a box already exists in the model.

A second slab is being drawn such that the third point of the slab lines up with the right side of the first box. This was done as follows:. This window shows the value used to determine the next point or value for the current tool. In this figure the value is the Distance from the previous point along the vector from the previous point to the current cursor location. For other tools, this value may be angle or relative offset, etc. The value is editable if the status bar at the bottom of the 3D or 2D View indicates it is.

If the user starts typing, the popup window will be replaced with an editing window as shown in Figure If the user presses ESC instead, the keyboard entry will be cancelled. Pressing TAB cycles through alternate input methods to determine the next value. For instance, pressing TAB with the wall tool allows the user to enter a relative offset from the last point instead of a distance.

Pressing TAB a second time allows the user to enter an absolute position for the next point, and pressing TAB a third time will cycle back to the distance input. Precise keyboard entry may be easiest for some users when using the multi-click mode of drawing rather than using the click-drag mode.

Using multi-click allows both hands to be used to type as opposed to click-drag, which requires one hand to remain on the mouse. There are some key differences between drawing in the 2D and 3D Views. The 2D View is useful when drawing should be restricted to one pre-defined plane. It is also useful for lining up objects along the X, Y, or Z axes. The 3D View is useful when an object such as a vent or solid-phase device needs to be snapped to the face of an obstruction or vent or if the user would like to build objects by stacking them on top of one another.

When drawing in the 2D View , the drawing will always take place in the drawing plane specified in the tool properties, and snapping is only performed in the local X and Y dimensions. The local Z value will remain true to the drawing plane. In addition, if a tool has some sort of height or depth property, the tool will also remain true to that value.

While snapping was used to partially align the objects, they both remain in the Z planes specified in their tool properties shown in the rotated view Figure The 3D View uses snapping in all three dimensions, causing tool properties to be interpreted more loosely.

The drawing plane and depth properties for a drawn object are context-sensitive in the 3D View. When using tools such as the slab tool, the first clicked point determines the drawing plane. If, on this first click, another object is snapped to, the drawing plane is set at the Z location of that snap point. This 3D snapping feature of the 3D View is useful for drawing vents on obstructions and attaching solid-phase devices to obstructions as shown in Figure The 3D snapping feature is also useful for stacking objects, as shown in Figure In this figure, the drawing plane was never changed.

All the objects were stacked on top of each other using snapping. While stacking can be useful for obstructions, a user must be more careful when drawing holes in the 3D View. For instance, with the slab hole tool and block hole tool , the user will need to change the extrusion direction to properly direct the hole into the obstruction.

For instance, if the user draws a slab obstruction in the 3D View and then draws a slab hole while snapping to the obstruction, the hole will be stacked on top of the obstruction without cutting a hole as shown in Figure This will result in a proper hole as shown in Figure This is not a problem in the 2D View since it always uses the drawing plane set in the tool properties instead of stacking the objects.

Once the drawing plane for a tool has been established by the first click, the tool can still determine the next points by snapping to objects in another plane. In this case, the snapped points will be projected to the drawing plane for the current tool. A dotted line will show how the snapped point was projected to the plane. There are four tools that can draw obstructions, for more information on obstructions, see Section 8.

Slab Obstruction Tool: Used to draw the slab for a floor. Wall Obstruction Tool : Used to draw a wall. Block Obstruction Tool: Used to fill grid cells with obstructions. Room Tool: Used to draw a rectangular room. For all the obstruction tools, the tool properties dialog will appear similar to that in Figure The only section of the dialog that will change between these tools is the geometry, such as Z Location and Thickness. All other properties, including name, surface, color, and obstruction flags appear in all obstruction dialogs.

These parameters control the properties that will be applied to the next drawn obstruction. The surface and color of the next obstruction can also be set via the right-click menu for the tool. A slab is an extruded polygonal object as shown in Figure 75 that can be used to draw the slab for a floor in a building. The slab obstruction tool adds two additional properties to the tool dialog for obstructions:.

The wall obstruction tool can be used to draw multi-segmented walls as shown in Figure In this figure, there is only one wall. The user specifies a path along the floor from which the wall is extruded up. The wall can be aligned to the left, right, or center of the drawn path. The alignment of the wall can be controlled through the right-click menu for the tool or can be cycled by pressing the CTRL key on the keyboard.

If the first clicked point is clicked again after drawing at least two segments or Close is chosen from the right-click menu, the tool will draw one last segment from the last clicked point to the first point and finish.

Alternately, the wall can be ended at the last clicked point by choosing Finish from the right-click menu. The Block Obstruction Tool can be used to quickly fill grid cells with blocks as shown in Figure 80 or place a block with a single click. In addition, the extrusion direction for the block can be toggled by pressing CTRL on the keyboard or through the right-click menu for the tool. The Room Tool can be used to draw a rectangular room using one closed wall as shown in Figure The room tool contains the same properties as the wall obstruction tool.

There are three tools that can draw holes, for more information on holes, see Section 8. Slab Hole Tool: Used to draw a hole in a floor slab. Wall Hole Tool : Used to draw an opening in a wall, such as for a doorway or window. Block Hole Tool: Used to fill grid cells with holes. All these tools work the same as their obstruction counterparts, but they do not have the properties specific to obstructions, such as the surface or obstruction flags.

There is only one tool for drawing vents for more information on vents, see Section 8. PyroSim only allows vents in an X, Y, or Z plane. Vents cannot currently be drawn off-axis like walls can. Vents also must be attached to solid obstructions at least one grid cell thick. This is easily accomplished by drawing the vent in the 3D View see Section 9.

Solution meshes can be easily split into two or more sub-meshes by using the Mesh Splitter Tool. PyroSim allows point devices to be drawn with the Device Tool , for more information on devices, Chapter This makes it trivial to attach a solid-phase device to an obstruction.

This makes it easy to draw devices at a specific height above the floor. Lock Z to [V] is the automatic behavior for gas-phase devices and Lock Z to Snap Location is the automatic behavior for solid-phase devices. Planar slices, as discussed in Section The slice plane can be changed through the right-click menu, by click-dragging the left mouse button, or by pressing CTRL on the keyboard to cycle through the options. HVAC nodes as discussed in Section Init Regions Section Particle Clouds Section Pressure Zones with the with the Zone Tool.

These tools draw axis-aligned boxes, and so they behave similarly. They all have the following drawing properties:. Handles appear on an object either as a blue dot as shown in Figure 90 or a face with a different color.

The dots indicate a point that can be moved in either two or three dimensions. A discolored face indicates that a face can be moved or extruded along a line. PyroSim provides a variety of tools to transform geometry objects.

With the transform tools, users can move, rotate, and mirror objects. Each tool has an alternate mode to copy the source objects with the transform. When using copy mode, the selected objects are copied and the copies are transformed. This tool allows the user to move selected objects to a new location as shown in Figure This tool allows the user to rotate selected objects as shown in Rotating an object with the Rotate Tool.

The selected objects will be rotated by the angle between the reference and angle vectors. The mirror tool allows objects to be mirrored across a plane as shown in Mirroring an object using the Mirror Tool below.

The right-click menu also allows quick selection of a surface in the model or recently-used color. PyroSim provides a Measure Tool to measure distances in the model.

This chapter provides guidance on using the geometry tools available in PyroSim to create several geometric shapes that often appear in building models. The ability to sketch in different planes, copy, replicate, drag, scale, and rotate objects can greatly simplify the tasks of geometry creation.

In all of the following examples, we will use a background image as a pattern to draw against. While this is not required, it makes creating curved surfaces much easier and one of the strengths of PyroSim is that it allows you to sketch geometry directly on top of building design images. The background image we will be using is shown in Figure For simplicity, we will assume that horizontal distance across the entire image is 50 feet, and we will place the origin of the model at the lower-left corner of the room shown in the image.

The Configure Background Image dialog shown in Figure illustrates these settings. This is the fastest way to create smooth curves in PyroSim. PyroSim will convert the curved walls to blocks before running the FDS simulation.

While smaller segments will make the wall look better in PyroSim, placement of obstructions generated for FDS depends on the resolution of your mesh. A curved wall drawn with three different segment lengths created with this technique are shown below. Using extremely short line segments will probably not be of any benefit unless you also use very small mesh cells. This technique forces you to convert the curve to blocks manually, but the advantage is you know exactly what geometry will be generated for FDS.

If you have a high resolution mesh, it may be useful to drag the mouse and “paint” the curve rather than clicking individual blocks. The example curved wall is shown in Figure To create curved objects using the rotation technique, you must place an initial segment, then perform a rotate-copy operation about the center point of your desired curve.

If we would have created 60 copies instead of 15 this procedure would have created a cylinder.

If you want to change properties like a revision, date or name on two or more sheets at the same time SSMPropEditor is for you. Your productivity will increase and reivt will save time avoiding a lot of manual autoedsk. If the property itself is not existing in the destination Sheet Set it will be created.

Import back the exported file after manual changes have been made. Search or Find and replace can be used for example in Notepad operting Excel. Launch your DWG application from the tree view opening the sheet drawing.

Workaround when sheet title contains unsupported characters? SSMPropEditor can help with this. SSMPropEditor will save you time and money and make you less frustrated when you don’t need to edit one sheet at a time. There are a few things that can be done to tune it in.

If it is quicker there might be ways to configure it to autodesk revit 2015 operating system unsupported free AutoCAD.

Another customer found that the size of the DST was increasing more than reasonable and was able to manually compress and remove erroneous data.

Eventually systek out that changing the “include in publish” autovesk was what caused the bloat. Purchase details. So for some reason, it looks like changing the “include in publish” status at least in this particular SS is fevit the bloat. SSMPropEditor works for 30 days in trial mode with full functionality. If you purchased on or after April 25, the upgrade is free of charge.

Current version is Purchase is also available through this site. Sign in with the same account used when purchasing. Both bit and bit. Contact us if there’s a need for support for older Windows versions. Windows 8. The software runs stand-alone and does not require AutoCAD or other CAD software to be installed unless renaming of actual layout autodesk revit 2015 operating system unsupported free should be done.

Compatible with GstarCAD and newer. DraftSight and newer. Use this link to purchase. If you have really many users that you unsuported to give access to this software we can discuss a discounted price based on your particular situation. Educational discounts available. Autodesk revit 2015 operating system unsupported free license is perpetual. Support and upgrades is included for unsup;orted minimum of 2 years after purchase. If you have more than one computer and you are the only user of the application one license is enough.

The network license system is available at no extra cost and normally most useful for companies with quite many licenses. The network license is priced the same but you basically need a license per user anyway as the license will be locked to that user for 4 weeks after last usage.

Reason is that this app is not such that you keep it running for an extended time. But the network license helps when you have many licenses as each computer does not need to be activated through us. There is volume discount available with purchase of multiple licenses. If your company is tax exempt note that BlueSnap does not currently offer a way to prevent tax from being charged on orders.

We need a copy of the tax exempt certificate to refund the tax if already paid. When your purchase is нажмите чтобы перейти you will aautodesk an email with the DST Converter download. The license is perpetual as a minimum for the version available when purchased and support is included. If you too have a need for any of these wishes please contact us so we know how big the need for it is and can prioritize accordingly.

You can renumber hundreds of sheets within seconds. The investment is well worth it. I actually bought a personal license for his Sheet Set Property Editor that makes backups of your DST file each нажмите чтобы прочитать больше you open one in the application. If you use Sheet Set Manager for your projects, I’d recommend getting yourself a license as well. It’s so helpful.

If you deal with Download mortal kombat 9 for windows 10 Sets often, especially large lets, this product will save you time if you have to renumber a set i. It took me about 20 seconds to renumber a page plan set. I have mentioned this to management several times. The program and the support is above and beyond. The SSM speeds up productivity, but autodesk revit 2015 operating system unsupported free SSM Properties Editor makes it 2007 professional plus free with product key free considering you can have titles 64 characters long and longer, plus special characters.

The ability to change properties on multiple sheets at once is something that really makes this worth having. I was able to change 45 sheet title blocks in a matter of minutes. I only needed to use the Prop editor once, but it worked ‘exactly like it said on the tin’. Why don’t Autodesk do this already? Great product. I’m editing custom sheet set data regarding drawn-by and checked by and lot of other data for hundreds of sheets in seconds while it took me days to do it – quote on AUGI.

Thanks for your support Jimmy. We managed to rename the Layouts as well. This app deserves 10 stars unfortunately I can only give 5. Best AutoCAD app available out there. Really wish I would have had this program several times in my career. It would have saved me a ton of work.

Huge time saver I haven’t done extensive testing on this app yet but it’s already saved me tons of work. Templates are great but there are simply times when you need to “retrofit” elements to existing sheet sets. I strongly recommend it. This initiation was overall excepted well, however one of the few complaints I have received is the inability of editing multiple drawing often in excess of drawings Titleblock information SSM Titleblock Fields.

The main comment was Sjstem users have indicated that using your software allows them страница update the title block data more effectively and efficiently, thus saving time with drawing revisions and submissions. I really appreciate your support. We will be certainly buying autodesk revit 2015 operating system unsupported free license. This has to be one of the best values for our money. Highly recommend this program for anyone who uses SheetSets.

Subscribe to the blog. Copy Sheet Properties from one sheet to one or multiple other sheets. Increment revisions quickly on multiple sheets. Paste the total sheet count to any property. Optionally rename the actual drawing file associated with the sheet. Optionally rename actual layout name on the drawing file autodesk revit 2015 operating system unsupported free with the sheet. Find and replace text values on properties.

Can be used without нажмите для продолжения CAD software being installed.

Update autodesk revit 2015 operating system unsupported free correct non-existing paths to improve performance of the Sheet Set Manager. DST Converter. SSMPropEditor System requirements. NET Framework 4. To rename the dree layout name full AutoCAD or newer needs to be installed. Version History. Version History Known issues in latest release and possibly older releases: Editing model view paths is not working.

Changing language within the application requires xystem restart it to avoid unexpected problems. Vault is by default supported. Contact us for other versions to be supported. Most recent and previous versions: – version Add handling of ignoring empty rows in imported Excel file. Corrected handling of DST icon in Explorer. Wishes and autodesk revit 2015 operating system unsupported free requests Optionally have a spread sheet view or grid to edit the values in. To manually rearrange the sheets or subsets and view categories.

Rename categories.

Color images can be compressed at a ratio of over We store geographic data in various database file formats. Esri created the file geodatabase to be a container for storing multiple attribute tables, vector and raster data sets. File geodatabases offer structural and performance advantages.

They have fast performance, versatile relationships, compatible storage for rasters, improved spatial indexes, data compression, customizable configuration, and 1 terabyte file size restrictions. Within a geodatabase, geographic datasets are referred to as feature classes. But geodatabases can store more complex data such as networks, raster mosaics, and feature data sets. Personal vs File Geodatabase. They used to be the most ubiquitous database type for managing geospatial data.

Personal geodatabases were advantageous because you could manage multiple attribute tables, vector and raster datasets and create relationship classes.

But their biggest drawback was their limited 2GB in storage capacity. Whereas file geodatabases offer 2TB of capacity. GPKG are self-contained serverless SQLite databases that can contain anything from vector, tiles, rasters, layer attributes, and even extensions. The file format is based on a SQLite database.

The only coordinate system MBTiles support is spherical Mercator. Smallworld software is widely used in electrical, telecommunication, gas, water and utilities. VMDS stores multiple types of raster and vector geometries in spatial and topological utility networks. They are also capable of querying and analysis in GE Smallworld.

SpatiaLite uses the SQLite database engine. They are open source and lightweight with the ability to hold spatial and non-spatial files in a single file container.

They also support versioned editing, backups, and recovery of an enterprise database over the same network. With support for different geometry types, the PostGIS spatial database allows querying and managing information about locations and mapping.

ArcSDE serves data in a centralized way over an entire organization using a relational database management system. End-users can access spatial data in an Esri environment and seamlessly edit and analyze data in an enterprise geodatabase.

As point cloud data, LiDAR is a dense network of coordinate points with elevation values. These GIS formats require specialized software or extensions to view or edit.

The LAS file format is a binary file format specifically for the interchange between vendors and customers. The dense networks of coordinate point measurements are so large sometimes that they often need to be split to prevent the file size from becoming too large. You can save significant storage space using the LAZ file format. Like most file compression, LAZ has no information loss. Through LAS datasets, you can visualize triangulated surfaces and perform statistical analysis. The first 3 columns generally represent X, Y and Z coordinates.

Non-binary files like XYZ are advantageous because they can be opened and edited in a text editor. Similar to other CAD design formats, engineers and architects use it for construction design.

Elevation file formats are specific to digital elevation model products. They are widely used in the industry because of the high volume of legacy elevation models produced by the USGS. The DEM format is a single file containing 3 record types.

They are a raster format consisting of terrain elevation values often captured from aircraft radar. User-defined attributes are assigned through TAB files. The 3 levels of resolutions contain various cell-spacing resolution:.

These web file formats are built specifically to serve and display geographic features over the internet. Although there are other web-based file formats that store geographic data such as GeoJSON , these file formats are unique to web mapping. Webfeeds with location have become a tool for disaster notification. Now, RSS have locations. Web feature services allows users to share geospatial or non-spatial over the internet.

Thus, feature services can be consumed through the internet in webmaps, desktop and web applications. Temporal data has a time component attached to it. A lot of weather data uses temporal GIS data formats because of how important time is related to weather.

Other examples of temporal data are demographic trends, land use patterns, and lightning strikes. An example of a multi-dimension NetCDF could be temperature, precipitation or wind speed over time. Generally, they all hierarchically store layers and then display them in a layout. ArcGIS uses this file format to store map layers in a table of contents. Each layer in a data frame references a data source.

Please let us know if you experience any issues when running Enscape under this operating system by submitting feedback via the Enscape Feedback Form. Enscape should work if your GPU is capable of running the minimum recommended drivers listed below.

Although we always advise that you should be running the latest available drivers for your GPU, sometimes the latest available GPU drivers can cause unforeseen issues and in such a case we strongly advise that you roll back to the drivers listed here:.

There are plenty of different system configurations and we are working every day to support more of them. Yes No. Here, only the input of your feedback is required.

The provision of further data, such as your e-mail address, is optional. If you provide further data, such as your e-mail address, we will use this to ask you questions about the feedback, if necessary, and thus to improve our services even more specifically. The legal basis for data processing is your consent Art. They can be seen in Figure These preferences define advanced 2D and 3D display properties, as shown in Figure They can be used to improve display performance on complex models, but they tend to create problems for some older graphics cards, including crashing.

For this reason, they are turned off when running in safe mode. PyroSim stores data related to user preferences in a file called PyroSim. By default, this file can be found in one of the following locations.

If at least one of these files exists, PyroSim will use it to load the user preferences. The PROPS file is stored in a plaintext format, and can be viewed or edited with any conventional text editor. While it is not recommended to edit the file directly, some troubleshooting techniques may involve deleting the PROPS file so that a new one can be created from scratch by PyroSim.

Configurations for hotkeys in PyroSim is stored in a separate file named keybindings. Models can be created in either English or Metric units. To select a system of units, on the View menu, click Units , then click the desired unit.

PyroSim will automatically convert your previous input values into the unit system you select. The Record View will always display values in the appropriate FDS units, regardless of what unit system you choose to work in. The custom color scheme is defined in the PyroSim. PyroSim provides the capability to save and recall view state from the 3D and 2D views in an object called a View.

Views can also be used to specify clipping regions that limit the amount of the model shown in the 3D and 2D views. Views appear in the Navigation View as shown in Figure There can be multiple views in a model, but at any given time, there is always one active view. A new model will always start with one default view that has no view state associated with it. State can be added to the view as described in the sections, Section 3.

Views are managed in the navigation view. From there, they can be created, deleted, grouped, rearranged, etc. This will add a new view to the model, saving the current camera viewpoint and section box into the new view see the following sections to learn more about viewpoints and section boxes. The new view will become the active view.

To delete a view, select it in the navigation view and in the Edit menu, select Delete. A view can only be deleted if it is not active. View settings can be copied or moved between views. To copy settings such as the viewpoint or section box select Copy , located in either the navigation view or in the Edit menu. To paste the settings to another view, select the desired target view and in the Edit menu select Paste.

To move settings from one view to another, in the navigation view, drag the setting to the desired view. Each view can have one viewpoint associated with it. When a viewpoint is saved, the current navigation tool is also saved with the view Orbit , Roam , etc. A viewpoint appears in the navigation view as a child item of a view and is labelled Viewpoint. This can be seen in Figure 20 for the two views, Inside and Section.

A viewpoint is automatically saved to newly created views. A viewpoint can also be explicitly saved in one of the following ways:. A viewpoint can be removed from a view by selecting the item, Viewpoint, in the navigation view and deleting it. A section box may also be added to a view. A section box is a convex region defined by six sides that is used to limit the scope of visible geometry.

All geometry outside the box is clipped from view. An example of the clipping is shown below. A section box is displayed as a dashed outline of the region. Each section box has a color associated with it that is used to display both the outline of the section box and the clipped portions of solid, clipped objects as shown in Effect of a Section Box , Figure In this figure, the section box is green, so any geometry that is clipped including the walls and slab in the image are also colored green.

The scope of a section box can be edited by selecting the section box and manipulating it like any other geometric object, see Section 9. Section boxes can also be rotated and moved like other geometric items, see Section 9. The properties of a section box can be edited by either double-clicking the section box or by right-clicking it and selecting Properties. The display for the section box can be independently hidden from view by de-selecting Show Section Boxes in the View menu.

A section box can also be reset to encompass the currently visible objects by performing one of the following:. Smokeview supports the concept of viewpoints, which are similar to PyroSim views. Smokeview viewpoints are defined by camera position, orientation, a navigation tool, and up to six axis-aligned clipping planes.

Viewpoints are stored in the Smokeview INI file. It does not write the views to the Smokeview INI file. This is to avoid view duplication in the 3D Results. This behavior can be changed, however, by turning off the Views file in the preferences, see Section 2.

At any time, the view information can be updated for the results without re-running the simulation by explicitly writing either the PyroSim Views file or the Smokeview INI file. In addition, if a view was saved in PyroSim with the Roam tool active, the Rotation type in Smokeview is set to Eye centered. For all other navigation tools, the Rotation type in Smokeview is set to 2 axis. Smokeview viewpoints may also be imported into PyroSim.

This is useful if additional views have been specified in Smokeview while viewing the results and those viewpoints should be preserved in PyroSim. To import Smokeview viewpoints, perform the following:. After importing, a new view group is added, containing one PyroSim view for each Smokeview viewpoint that was in the INI file. Several files are used when performing a fire analysis using PyroSim. This section describes how to load and save files in the formats supported by PyroSim.

When PyroSim is started, it begins with an empty model. You can close the current model and create a new empty model by opening the File menu and clicking New. PyroSim always has one and only one active model. The PyroSim model contains all the information needed to write an FDS input file, as well as additional information such as obstruction grouping, floor heights, background images, and textures.

This format is ideal for sharing your models with other PyroSim users. A list of recently opened files is also available. PyroSim has an auto-save feature which stores a copy of your current model every 10 minutes. This file is automatically deleted if PyroSim exits normally, but if PyroSim crashes, you can recover your work by opening the autosave file. It can be found either in the same directory as your most recent PSM file, or in the PyroSim installation directory if your model was unsaved.

For more information about opening files saved with previous versions of PyroSim, please refer to Appendix A and Appendix B. PyroSim supports write protection for a model. When write protection is enabled, users cannot modify a model e. This option can be enabled with or without password protection. If a model is write-protected, PyroSim will display notification in the application title bar.

The model will now be write-protected. Since a password was not used, a password will not be required to remove write protection. PyroSim allows you to import existing FDS input files. During import, PyroSim will check for the validity of each record.

If errors are detected, you will be notified. You may then make the required corrections and attempt to import the file again. PyroSim supports file import for versions 4, 5, and 6 of FDS. PyroSim also allows you to explicitly export the current model to an FDS input file.

You can manually edit the file to take advantage of advanced FDS features, or to easily transfer the input file to a different machine or special version of FDS. Each type of file provides a variety of geometry that can either be directly represented as obstructions or as drawing guides in the PyroSim model. This is useful when there is one blueprint per floor of a building or a 3D building has been split into several sections, each in a separate file.

STL files will import as shown in Section 4. For non-STL files, a step-by-step dialog will open as shown in Figure When PyroSim imports a CAD file, it will treat all 3D face data as obstructions and all other data lines, curves, etc.

These objects will be represented as FDS geometry. With the exception of IFC files, all other entities and objects from other CAD formats that contain faces are treated as collections of thin obstructions by PyroSim. They cannot be reliably treated as solid since there is no guarantee that their faces form a closed and non-self-intersecting shell or that this would even be desired.

Once the file is imported, PyroSim creates a hierarchy of groups and objects, such that there is one top group, named after the file. The next levels depend on the imported file type. Under each layer group there are one or more objects representing the entities in the file. The following illustrates the hierarchy as it would appear in the Navigation View :. PyroSim can also import objects from STL files, which are simply listings of triangles.

Usually, each STL file represents the shell of one 3D solid object. Because the STL file is simply a listing of triangles, there may be more than one object represented in the file. PyroSim will use the vertex weld tolerance to detect triangle connectivity and determine if there are several, disconnected sets of faces in the file. If there are, there will be one resulting PyroSim object per connected set of faces.

In addition, if the solid option is enabled or the objects are being treated as holes, import will only succeed if each face set is detected as a closed shell by PyroSim. Each method has advantages and disadvantages as discussed below. Some CAD files contain 2D floor plans, which, on their own, cannot be used in a simulation.

These types of files must first be converted into solid 3D geometry. There are two ways in which this can be accomplished. The first involves using the floor plan as a guide to draw the 3D model. See Chapter 9 for more information. The second is to convert lines that represent walls into 3D walls using automated tools.

This can be done as follows:. All FDS calculations are performed within computational meshes. Every object in the simulation e. Any object that extends beyond the boundary of the physical domain is cut off at the boundary. There is no penalty for defining objects outside of the domain, but these objects do not appear in the Results.

To achieve optimal simulation accuracy, it is important to use mesh cells that are approximately the same size in all three directions. A side effect of this approach is that optimal mesh divisions are constrained to the form 2 u 3 v 5 w , where u, v and w are integers.

However, 37, 99 and are not. In addition, using a prime number of cells along an axis may cause undesirable results. PyroSim warns when the number of divisions is not optimal.

The resulting meshes are displayed below. The term “multiple meshes” means that the computational domain consists of more than one rectangular mesh, usually connected, although this is not required. In each mesh, the governing equations can be solved with a time step based on the flow speed within that particular mesh. Some reasons for using multiple meshes include:.

Meshes can overlap, abut, or not touch at all. In the last case, essentially two separate calculations are performed with no communication at all between them. Obstructions and vents are entered in terms of the overall coordinate system and need not apply to any one particular mesh. Each mesh checks the coordinates of all the geometric entities and decides whether or not they are to be included. To simplify working with multiple meshes, PyroSim provides the following additional mesh operations:.

To use any of the above actions, select one or more meshes, right-click to open a popup menu, then click the desired mesh action. To simulate a surface made of heat-conducting solids or a fuel you must specify a material that describes certain thermal properties and pyrolysis behavior. PyroSim offers two categories of materials: solid materials and liquid fuels.

To create a new material, you can use the Edit Materials dialog. On the Model menu, click Edit Materials. Examples of solid materials include brick, gypsum board, and upholstery. To create a solid material:. After following these steps, a default solid material will be created.

Text entered in the Description box will not affect the simulation, but will be preserved in the FDS input file using the FYI field of the material. Including a description of the material is recommended. The Pyrolysis tab provides options to set the heat of combustion and add reactions that will be used to govern how the material burns.

Each material can have a maximum of 10 reactions. To add a reaction, click the Add button. This will open a dialog to edit the new reaction.

It provides the following options:. The thermal properties tab for liquid fuels is identical to the thermal properties tab for solid fuels, see Section 6. Surfaces are used to define the properties of solid objects and vents in your FDS model. The surface can use previously defined materials in mixtures or layers. By default, all solid objects and vents are inert, with a temperature that is fixed at the ambient temperature set in the Simulation Parameters dialog.

In addition to defining heat conduction in a solid, surfaces can also be used to define a burner, specify the ignition temperature for an object, give a vent a supply velocity, and set the many other properties supported by FDS. To create, modify, and delete surfaces, you can use the Edit Surfaces dialog. The dialog in Figure 35 shows the dialog being used to edit an upholstery surface.

These surfaces cannot be changed and are present in every analysis. This surface remains fixed at the ambient temperature. This surface is used only for vents on the exterior mesh boundary. It is intended to be applied to an entire mesh boundary to symmetrically double the size of the domain. PyroSim aids the user by organizing the surface options into logical types, such as a burner to define a simple fire or a layered surface to represent a solid, heat conducting wall.

The Edit Surfaces dialog helps define a surface type with a set of tabs. Each tab provides a collection of input fields and settings for the user to customize that surface type. Air leak surfaces can be used to create a permeable barrier between two pressure zones, defined by the Leak Path in the Edit Surfaces dialog. The leak area is defined by the zones selected. It allows you to customize the description, color, and texture of the inert surface described in Reserved Surfaces.

Exhaust surfaces can be used to remove gas from the simulation domain. The specification of their air movement parameters is identical to that of a supply surface, but instead of the velocity or flux driving air into the domain, they are pulling air out. Exhaust surfaces do not have the option to apply injection or geometry properties.

Tabs: Advanced , Air Flow , Thermal. The General Surface type is a hybrid between the Burner and Supply surface types. Adding a little more flexibility than either of them individually. This surface type represents a radiative heat source. The options are identical to the options for a burner without the heat release options. If the surface temperature is less than the ambient temperature, the surface will remove heat from the surrounding gases.

Layered surfaces are composed of one or more material definitions. Materials include solid and liquid substances such as concrete, pine, and ethanol. For more information about materials and how they can be specified in PyroSim, please refer to Chapter 6. This type of surface is ideal for walls and other objects that are composed of real-world materials.

This surface type can also be used to inject extra non-reactive species into the simulation. This surface represents a vent that injects air into the simulation domain. The temperature of the air injected by supply vents can be controlled using settings on the thermal tab. Species Injection options are available if the Specify Mass Flux of Individual Species option in the Air Flow group is selected and there are extra, non-reactive species present in the simulation.

Each tab of the Edit Surfaces dialog provides a set of inputs and settings that can be used to build a custom surface type as listed in Section 7. The following sections describe the parameters on each tab and are listed in alphabetical order, not the order they might appear for a surface type.

The reaction used to model a given surface can either be taken from the material specifications, or given explicitly by the surface. Manually specifying the parameters will produce a surface similar to a burner. You can inject extra non-reactive species into the simulation using the species injection options. To use these options, you must first specify species using the Edit Species dialog.

You can add textures to surfaces to increase the realism of your model. This can be done through the use of Appearance objects. An Appearance defines how the surfaces of objects will appear and can have colors or textures applied to them. Some default appearances are provided or you can import your own. The Room Fire example demonstrates using a wood texture for a pine floor and hanging a picture on a wall. Your textures will be automatically displayed in PyroSim. Appearances will be shown on obstructions and vents when the View Mode is either Realistic or Realistic with Outlines.

Appearances can also be viewed by going to the Model menu and selecting Edit Appearances. Geometry can either be created through dialogs or by using the drafting tools in the 2D or 3D views as discussed in Chapter 9. The user can also organize the model by creating floors and groups.

In addition, the user can assign background images to floors to aid in drafting. Obstructions are the fundamental geometric representation in FDS. In FDS, obstructions are rectangular, axis-aligned solids defined by two points. Surface properties are assigned to each face of the obstruction. In PyroSim, obstructions can take any shape, have any number of faces, and have different surfaces applied to each face. At the time of simulation, PyroSim will automatically convert the obstructions to axis-aligned blocks required by FDS as discussed in Section To create a new obstruction, either use an obstruction drawing tool as discussed in Chapter 9 or on the Model menu, click New Obstruction.

This tab of the obstruction panel presents all options other than those controlling geometry and surface information. This includes activation events conditions that can cause the obstruction to be added or removed from the simulation and miscellaneous options such as color and smoothing. This tab allows you to enter the min and max coordinates of the object. For more elaborate geometry, such as slabs, this tab may contain a table of points and extrusion options.

Extrusion is the mechanism PyroSim uses to extend 2-dimensional objects along a vector – creating a 3-dimensional object. The Surfaces tab can be used to specify one surface to be used for all six sides of the object or assign surfaces on a per-face basis. Alternately, surfaces can be “painted” using the Paint Tool as discussed in Section 9. Holes are used to carve negative spaces out of obstructions. In FDS, holes are similar to obstructions in that they are defined as axis-aligned blocks.

Like obstructions in PyroSim, however, holes can be any shape. PyroSim automatically converts them to blocks in the FDS input file. PyroSim treats holes as first-class objects that can be selected, deleted, and have other operations performed on them like obstructions as discussed in Chapter In the 3D and 2D views, holes appear as transparent objects.

In addition, for display purposes only, PyroSim carves holes out of obstructions as shown in Figure For complex holes or obstructions or large holes that span many obstructions, this process may be slow. In these cases, hole-cutting display can be turned off by going to the View menu and deselecting Cut Holes From Obstructions. By default, all obstructions allow holes to be cut from them. To prevent an obstruction from allowing holes, edit the properties of the obstruction as discussed in Section 8.

There are various rules that govern how holes are written to the FDS input file. In general, if the PYROGEOM file is enabled, a hole has control logic, and the hole intersects obstructions, the hole will be pre-subtracted from obstructions before the obstructions are converted into blocks, and the holes will be excluded from the FDS file. If the above conditions do not hold, the holes are converted to blocks similarly to obstructions and are written as HOLE records.

For more information, see Section Holes can either be drawn as discussed in Chapter 9 or can be created by opening the Model menu and clicking New Hole. Like obstructions, holes can also be activated as discussed in Chapter Holes can also have a color applied. When starting a simulation or exporting an FDS file for some models, the user may receive the following message as shown in Figure 42 : “PyroSim has detected a hole touching a mesh boundary, which may cause cutting problems in FDS.

Would you like to slightly expand these types of holes? FDS currently has an issue where it will not fully cut a hole from an obstruction if both the hole and obstruction touch a mesh boundary at the same location.

Instead, FDS leaves a thin obstruction along the mesh boundary. Figure 43 shows a model in PyroSim that can lead this problem. In this model, both the hole and the obstruction touch the bottom of the mesh, and the hole should cut all the way through the mesh. Figure 44 shows this model in FDS where the hole has not been punched all the way through the obstruction. PyroSim detects potential cases where this might happen and prompts the user with the Expand Boundary Holes dialog.

This ensures the hole is properly cut all the way through the obstruction as shown in Figure If the user chooses not to expand these types of holes the No option , the hole will be written exactly as specified and may lead to the thin obstruction problem. Vents have general usage in FDS to describe a 2D rectangular patch on the surface of a solid obstruction or on a mesh boundary as shown in Figure A vent may have a different surface applied to it than the rest of the obstruction to which it is attached.

Taken literally, a vent can be used to model components of the ventilation system in a building, like a diffuser or a return. In these cases, the vent coordinates form a plane on a solid surface forming the boundary of the duct. No holes need to be created through the solid; it is assumed that air is pushed out of or sucked into duct work within the wall. You can also use vents as a means of applying a particular boundary condition to a rectangular patch on a solid surface.

A fire, for example, is usually created by first generating a solid obstruction and then specifying a vent somewhere on one of the faces of the solid with the characteristics of the thermal and combustion properties of the fuel. For more information on these types, see Chapter 7.

Vents can either be drawn as discussed in Chapter 9 or be created by opening the Model menu and clicking New Vent. This will open the New Vent dialog as shown in Figure With the exception of Fire Spread , the other properties are similar to obstructions. So for some reason, it looks like changing the “include in publish” status at least in this particular SS is causing the bloat. SSMPropEditor works for 30 days in trial mode with full functionality. If you purchased on or after April 25, the upgrade is free of charge.

Current version is Purchase is also available through this site. Sign in with the same account used when purchasing. Both bit and bit. Contact us if there’s a need for support for older Windows versions.

Windows 8. The software runs stand-alone and does not require AutoCAD or other CAD software to be installed unless renaming of actual layout name should be done. Compatible with GstarCAD and newer. DraftSight and newer. Use this link to purchase. If you have really many users that you want to give access to this software we can discuss a discounted price based on your particular situation.

Educational discounts available. The license is perpetual. Support and upgrades is included for a minimum of 2 years after purchase. If you have more than one computer and you are the only user of the application one license is enough. The network license system is available at no extra cost and normally most useful for companies with quite many licenses.

The network license is priced the same but you basically need a license per user anyway as the license will be locked to that user for 4 weeks after last usage. Reason is that this app is not such that you keep it running for an extended time. But the network license helps when you have many licenses as each computer does not need to be activated through us. There is volume discount available with purchase of multiple licenses. If your company is tax exempt note that BlueSnap does not currently offer a way to prevent tax from being charged on orders.

We need a copy of the tax exempt certificate to refund the tax if already paid. When your purchase is completed you will get an email with the DST Converter download. The license is perpetual as a minimum for the version available when purchased and support is included. If you too have a need for any of these wishes please contact us so we know how big the need for it is and can prioritize accordingly. You can renumber hundreds of sheets within seconds.

The investment is well worth it. I actually bought a personal license for his Sheet Set Property Editor that makes backups of your DST file each time you open one in the application.

 

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The term “multiple meshes” means that the computational domain consists of more than one rectangular mesh, usually connected, although this is not required. In each mesh, the governing equations can be solved with a time step based on the flow speed within that particular mesh. Some reasons for using multiple meshes include:. Meshes can overlap, abut, or not touch at all. In the last case, essentially two separate calculations are performed with no communication at all between them.

Obstructions and vents are entered in terms of the overall coordinate system and need not apply to any one particular mesh. Each mesh checks the coordinates of all the geometric entities and decides whether or not they are to be included. To simplify working with multiple meshes, PyroSim provides the following additional mesh operations:.

To use any of the above actions, select one or more meshes, right-click to open a popup menu, then click the desired mesh action. To simulate a surface made of heat-conducting solids or a fuel you must specify a material that describes certain thermal properties and pyrolysis behavior. PyroSim offers two categories of materials: solid materials and liquid fuels. To create a new material, you can use the Edit Materials dialog.

On the Model menu, click Edit Materials. Examples of solid materials include brick, gypsum board, and upholstery. To create a solid material:. After following these steps, a default solid material will be created. Text entered in the Description box will not affect the simulation, but will be preserved in the FDS input file using the FYI field of the material. Including a description of the material is recommended. The Pyrolysis tab provides options to set the heat of combustion and add reactions that will be used to govern how the material burns.

Each material can have a maximum of 10 reactions. To add a reaction, click the Add button. This will open a dialog to edit the new reaction. It provides the following options:. The thermal properties tab for liquid fuels is identical to the thermal properties tab for solid fuels, see Section 6.

Surfaces are used to define the properties of solid objects and vents in your FDS model. The surface can use previously defined materials in mixtures or layers. By default, all solid objects and vents are inert, with a temperature that is fixed at the ambient temperature set in the Simulation Parameters dialog. In addition to defining heat conduction in a solid, surfaces can also be used to define a burner, specify the ignition temperature for an object, give a vent a supply velocity, and set the many other properties supported by FDS.

To create, modify, and delete surfaces, you can use the Edit Surfaces dialog. The dialog in Figure 35 shows the dialog being used to edit an upholstery surface. These surfaces cannot be changed and are present in every analysis.

This surface remains fixed at the ambient temperature. This surface is used only for vents on the exterior mesh boundary.

It is intended to be applied to an entire mesh boundary to symmetrically double the size of the domain. PyroSim aids the user by organizing the surface options into logical types, such as a burner to define a simple fire or a layered surface to represent a solid, heat conducting wall. The Edit Surfaces dialog helps define a surface type with a set of tabs. Each tab provides a collection of input fields and settings for the user to customize that surface type. Air leak surfaces can be used to create a permeable barrier between two pressure zones, defined by the Leak Path in the Edit Surfaces dialog.

The leak area is defined by the zones selected. It allows you to customize the description, color, and texture of the inert surface described in Reserved Surfaces. Exhaust surfaces can be used to remove gas from the simulation domain. The specification of their air movement parameters is identical to that of a supply surface, but instead of the velocity or flux driving air into the domain, they are pulling air out.

Exhaust surfaces do not have the option to apply injection or geometry properties. Tabs: Advanced , Air Flow , Thermal. The General Surface type is a hybrid between the Burner and Supply surface types. Adding a little more flexibility than either of them individually. This surface type represents a radiative heat source. The options are identical to the options for a burner without the heat release options.

If the surface temperature is less than the ambient temperature, the surface will remove heat from the surrounding gases. Layered surfaces are composed of one or more material definitions. Materials include solid and liquid substances such as concrete, pine, and ethanol. For more information about materials and how they can be specified in PyroSim, please refer to Chapter 6.

This type of surface is ideal for walls and other objects that are composed of real-world materials. This surface type can also be used to inject extra non-reactive species into the simulation. This surface represents a vent that injects air into the simulation domain. The temperature of the air injected by supply vents can be controlled using settings on the thermal tab. Species Injection options are available if the Specify Mass Flux of Individual Species option in the Air Flow group is selected and there are extra, non-reactive species present in the simulation.

Each tab of the Edit Surfaces dialog provides a set of inputs and settings that can be used to build a custom surface type as listed in Section 7. The following sections describe the parameters on each tab and are listed in alphabetical order, not the order they might appear for a surface type.

The reaction used to model a given surface can either be taken from the material specifications, or given explicitly by the surface. Manually specifying the parameters will produce a surface similar to a burner.

You can inject extra non-reactive species into the simulation using the species injection options. To use these options, you must first specify species using the Edit Species dialog. You can add textures to surfaces to increase the realism of your model. This can be done through the use of Appearance objects. An Appearance defines how the surfaces of objects will appear and can have colors or textures applied to them.

Some default appearances are provided or you can import your own. The Room Fire example demonstrates using a wood texture for a pine floor and hanging a picture on a wall. Your textures will be automatically displayed in PyroSim. Appearances will be shown on obstructions and vents when the View Mode is either Realistic or Realistic with Outlines.

Appearances can also be viewed by going to the Model menu and selecting Edit Appearances. Geometry can either be created through dialogs or by using the drafting tools in the 2D or 3D views as discussed in Chapter 9. The user can also organize the model by creating floors and groups.

In addition, the user can assign background images to floors to aid in drafting. Obstructions are the fundamental geometric representation in FDS. In FDS, obstructions are rectangular, axis-aligned solids defined by two points. Surface properties are assigned to each face of the obstruction. In PyroSim, obstructions can take any shape, have any number of faces, and have different surfaces applied to each face. At the time of simulation, PyroSim will automatically convert the obstructions to axis-aligned blocks required by FDS as discussed in Section To create a new obstruction, either use an obstruction drawing tool as discussed in Chapter 9 or on the Model menu, click New Obstruction.

This tab of the obstruction panel presents all options other than those controlling geometry and surface information. This includes activation events conditions that can cause the obstruction to be added or removed from the simulation and miscellaneous options such as color and smoothing. This tab allows you to enter the min and max coordinates of the object. For more elaborate geometry, such as slabs, this tab may contain a table of points and extrusion options. Extrusion is the mechanism PyroSim uses to extend 2-dimensional objects along a vector – creating a 3-dimensional object.

The Surfaces tab can be used to specify one surface to be used for all six sides of the object or assign surfaces on a per-face basis. Alternately, surfaces can be “painted” using the Paint Tool as discussed in Section 9. Holes are used to carve negative spaces out of obstructions. In FDS, holes are similar to obstructions in that they are defined as axis-aligned blocks. Like obstructions in PyroSim, however, holes can be any shape. PyroSim automatically converts them to blocks in the FDS input file.

PyroSim treats holes as first-class objects that can be selected, deleted, and have other operations performed on them like obstructions as discussed in Chapter In the 3D and 2D views, holes appear as transparent objects. In addition, for display purposes only, PyroSim carves holes out of obstructions as shown in Figure For complex holes or obstructions or large holes that span many obstructions, this process may be slow.

In these cases, hole-cutting display can be turned off by going to the View menu and deselecting Cut Holes From Obstructions. By default, all obstructions allow holes to be cut from them.

To prevent an obstruction from allowing holes, edit the properties of the obstruction as discussed in Section 8. There are various rules that govern how holes are written to the FDS input file. In general, if the PYROGEOM file is enabled, a hole has control logic, and the hole intersects obstructions, the hole will be pre-subtracted from obstructions before the obstructions are converted into blocks, and the holes will be excluded from the FDS file.

If the above conditions do not hold, the holes are converted to blocks similarly to obstructions and are written as HOLE records. For more information, see Section Holes can either be drawn as discussed in Chapter 9 or can be created by opening the Model menu and clicking New Hole.

Like obstructions, holes can also be activated as discussed in Chapter Holes can also have a color applied. When starting a simulation or exporting an FDS file for some models, the user may receive the following message as shown in Figure 42 : “PyroSim has detected a hole touching a mesh boundary, which may cause cutting problems in FDS. Would you like to slightly expand these types of holes?

FDS currently has an issue where it will not fully cut a hole from an obstruction if both the hole and obstruction touch a mesh boundary at the same location. Instead, FDS leaves a thin obstruction along the mesh boundary.

Figure 43 shows a model in PyroSim that can lead this problem. In this model, both the hole and the obstruction touch the bottom of the mesh, and the hole should cut all the way through the mesh. Figure 44 shows this model in FDS where the hole has not been punched all the way through the obstruction. PyroSim detects potential cases where this might happen and prompts the user with the Expand Boundary Holes dialog. This ensures the hole is properly cut all the way through the obstruction as shown in Figure If the user chooses not to expand these types of holes the No option , the hole will be written exactly as specified and may lead to the thin obstruction problem.

Vents have general usage in FDS to describe a 2D rectangular patch on the surface of a solid obstruction or on a mesh boundary as shown in Figure A vent may have a different surface applied to it than the rest of the obstruction to which it is attached.

Taken literally, a vent can be used to model components of the ventilation system in a building, like a diffuser or a return. In these cases, the vent coordinates form a plane on a solid surface forming the boundary of the duct.

No holes need to be created through the solid; it is assumed that air is pushed out of or sucked into duct work within the wall.

You can also use vents as a means of applying a particular boundary condition to a rectangular patch on a solid surface. A fire, for example, is usually created by first generating a solid obstruction and then specifying a vent somewhere on one of the faces of the solid with the characteristics of the thermal and combustion properties of the fuel. For more information on these types, see Chapter 7. Vents can either be drawn as discussed in Chapter 9 or be created by opening the Model menu and clicking New Vent.

This will open the New Vent dialog as shown in Figure With the exception of Fire Spread , the other properties are similar to obstructions. Fire Spread can be specified on vents using a burner surface Chapter 7. This option simulates a radially spreading fire at the vent. A vent can also be given radial properties.

Groups can be used to hierarchically organize the model. Groups can only be seen in the Navigation View. The “Model” is the base group. Users can nest groups inside other groups, allowing the user to work with thousands of objects in an organized way. When the user performs an action on a group, that action will be propagated to all objects in the group. Both of these actions will show the Create Group dialog as shown in Figure This dialog allows the user to choose the parent group and name of the new group.

In the Change Group dialog shown in Figure 52 , select the desired group. If a new group is desired, select New Subgroup and specify a name.

If this is chosen, a new group will be created under the specified existing group, and the selected objects will be moved to this new group. All newly drawn objects will be added to this group. Floors are used in PyroSim to quickly apply clipping filters to the scene to only show a portion of the model. They are also used to initialize the properties of drawing tools so that they draw at the proper Z location. An example of floor clipping is shown in Floor clipping , where Figure 54 shows all floors and Figure 55 shows a single floor.

This will display the Manage Floors dialog shown in Figure To add a new floor, click the Add Floor. This will show the New Floor dialog shown in Figure In this dialog, if the user enters a new slab thickness , the elevation will be automatically updated so the new floor does not overlap the others unless the user enters a specific value for the elevation.

In addition, unless the user enters a specific name, a name will be automatically generated based on the elevation. Press OK again in the Manage Floors dialog to commit the changes. By default, the model contains one floor at elevation 0. Using these values leaves a distance of 3. Once the floors have been defined, the user can filter the display to show either a single floor or all floors as shown in Figure 7. For most views, the Z clipping range for a particular floor is from the floor elevation minus slab thickness to floor elevation plus wall height.

The Z clipping range works differently for the top camera of the 2D view, however. In this view, the clipping is from the elevation of the floor BELOW to the elevation plus wall height of the current floor. This allows the geometry on the floor below to be snapped to in drawing geometry for the current floor.

For this to be useful, however, the user may want to use wireframe rendering. Each floor can have an associated background image. To add a background image to a floor, go to the 2D or 3D View, select a specific floor, then click the Configure Background Image button. Alternately click the Define Floor Locations button, , and then in the Background Image column, select the Edit button.

This will display the Configure Background Image dialog shown in Figure Now, in the 3D or 2D views, when the user displays a specific floor, the background image for that floor will be displayed. To turn off the background images, go to the 2D or 3D View, and click the Show Background Images button next to the floors drop-down. While not a full-fledged drafting application, PyroSim does provide useful drawing features, including the following:.

PyroSim provides several drawing and editing tools. These tools are located on the drawing toolbar at the left side of the 3D and 2D Views as shown in Figure Some of these tools allow a user to create and edit objects such as slabs and walls that are not constrained to the FDS mesh. In these cases, PyroSim will automatically convert the shapes to mesh-based blocks when the FDS input file is created.

For information on block conversion, see Section To begin drawing or editing with a tool, the user can single-click the tool from the tool bar. The button will show a green dot when pinned. Every time the same tool button is clicked, the pinned state of that tool will be toggled, so clicking the button again after pinning will disable pinning. This will also cancel pinning and will revert back to the last-used navigation tool. Each tool has a set of properties that can be modified by clicking the Tool Properties button located at the bottom of the toolbar after selecting the desired tool.

Options such as elevation, height, surface, and color can all be edited in the Tool Properties dialog. In addition to the tool properties, each tool also has additional quick actions. To show these actions, start the desired tool and then right-click in the 2D or 3D View. This opens a context menu with the quick actions. Figure 60 shows an example of the quick action menu for the wall tool.

This menu allows the user to perform actions specific to the tool, such as closing a polygon, picking a surface, setting wall alignment, accessing the tool properties, etc.

Snapping is one way to precisely draw and edit objects. It is the process of finding some element in the scene, such as a vertex or edge close to the cursor, and snapping the cursor to that element like a magnet. In PyroSim, snapping can be performed against the solution meshes, objects in the model, and orthographic constraints. The 2D View additionally provides a sketch grid and polar angle constraints. If a snap point is found, an indicator dot shown in Figure 61 will appear at the snap point.

By default, snapping is enabled. If there are any solution meshes in the model see Chapter 5 , PyroSim can snap to them during drawing and editing. For each mesh that is visible, PyroSim can snap to its boundary edges, boundary faces, grid lines, and the intersections of the grid lines, depending on which mesh display filters are active as discussed in Section 2. PyroSim also provides a user-defined drawing grid, or sketch grid, in the 2D View as shown in Figure When a new model is created, the sketch grid is visible and can be snapped to in the 2D view.

The default spacing for the divisions is 1 m, but can be changed by going to the View menu and clicking Set Sketch Grid Spacing. Once the user has created a solution mesh, PyroSim will automatically switch to solution mesh snapping and disable sketch grid snapping. In the 2D View , PyroSim will only snap to the sketch grid or visible solution meshes. To disable grid snapping altogether, on the View menu choose Disable Grid Snapping. There are three basic categories of geometry that can be snapped to on objects: faces , edges , and vertices.

Objects can have any combination of types. If there are multiple types close to the cursor, PyroSim will give vertices precedence over edges and edges precedence over faces. Constraints are dynamic snapping lines that are only visible when the cursor is near them. They appear as infinite dotted lines as shown in Figure If a constraint is currently being snapped to, that constraint can be locked by holding SHIFT on the keyboard. While holding SHIFT , a second dotted line will extend from the cursor to the locked constraint the first dotted line.

This is useful for lining up objects along a constraint with other objects. For instance, in Figure 64 , a box already exists in the model. A second slab is being drawn such that the third point of the slab lines up with the right side of the first box. This was done as follows:. This window shows the value used to determine the next point or value for the current tool.

In this figure the value is the Distance from the previous point along the vector from the previous point to the current cursor location. For other tools, this value may be angle or relative offset, etc. The value is editable if the status bar at the bottom of the 3D or 2D View indicates it is. If the user starts typing, the popup window will be replaced with an editing window as shown in Figure If the user presses ESC instead, the keyboard entry will be cancelled.

Pressing TAB cycles through alternate input methods to determine the next value. For instance, pressing TAB with the wall tool allows the user to enter a relative offset from the last point instead of a distance.

Pressing TAB a second time allows the user to enter an absolute position for the next point, and pressing TAB a third time will cycle back to the distance input. Precise keyboard entry may be easiest for some users when using the multi-click mode of drawing rather than using the click-drag mode. Using multi-click allows both hands to be used to type as opposed to click-drag, which requires one hand to remain on the mouse. There are some key differences between drawing in the 2D and 3D Views.

The 2D View is useful when drawing should be restricted to one pre-defined plane. It is also useful for lining up objects along the X, Y, or Z axes. The 3D View is useful when an object such as a vent or solid-phase device needs to be snapped to the face of an obstruction or vent or if the user would like to build objects by stacking them on top of one another. When drawing in the 2D View , the drawing will always take place in the drawing plane specified in the tool properties, and snapping is only performed in the local X and Y dimensions.

The local Z value will remain true to the drawing plane. In addition, if a tool has some sort of height or depth property, the tool will also remain true to that value.

While snapping was used to partially align the objects, they both remain in the Z planes specified in their tool properties shown in the rotated view Figure The 3D View uses snapping in all three dimensions, causing tool properties to be interpreted more loosely. The drawing plane and depth properties for a drawn object are context-sensitive in the 3D View.

When using tools such as the slab tool, the first clicked point determines the drawing plane. If, on this first click, another object is snapped to, the drawing plane is set at the Z location of that snap point. This 3D snapping feature of the 3D View is useful for drawing vents on obstructions and attaching solid-phase devices to obstructions as shown in Figure The 3D snapping feature is also useful for stacking objects, as shown in Figure In this figure, the drawing plane was never changed.

All the objects were stacked on top of each other using snapping. While stacking can be useful for obstructions, a user must be more careful when drawing holes in the 3D View. For instance, with the slab hole tool and block hole tool , the user will need to change the extrusion direction to properly direct the hole into the obstruction.

For instance, if the user draws a slab obstruction in the 3D View and then draws a slab hole while snapping to the obstruction, the hole will be stacked on top of the obstruction without cutting a hole as shown in Figure This will result in a proper hole as shown in Figure This is not a problem in the 2D View since it always uses the drawing plane set in the tool properties instead of stacking the objects. Once the drawing plane for a tool has been established by the first click, the tool can still determine the next points by snapping to objects in another plane.

In this case, the snapped points will be projected to the drawing plane for the current tool. A dotted line will show how the snapped point was projected to the plane. There are four tools that can draw obstructions, for more information on obstructions, see Section 8. Slab Obstruction Tool: Used to draw the slab for a floor. Wall Obstruction Tool : Used to draw a wall.

Block Obstruction Tool: Used to fill grid cells with obstructions. Room Tool: Used to draw a rectangular room. For all the obstruction tools, the tool properties dialog will appear similar to that in Figure The only section of the dialog that will change between these tools is the geometry, such as Z Location and Thickness. All other properties, including name, surface, color, and obstruction flags appear in all obstruction dialogs.

These parameters control the properties that will be applied to the next drawn obstruction. The surface and color of the next obstruction can also be set via the right-click menu for the tool. Grids have no extension and are unique because they can hold attribute data in a raster file.

But the catch is that you can only add attributes to integer grids. Attributes are stored in a value attribute table VAT — one record for each unique value in the grid, and the count representing the number of cells. The two types of Esri Grid files are integer and floating point grids. Land cover would be an example of a discrete grid. Each class has a unique integer cell value. Elevation data is an example of a floating point grid.

Each cell represents an elevation floating value. Lossy GIS compression reduces file size by permanently eliminating certain information, especially redundant information even though the user may not notice it. These lossy compression algorithms often result in greater reductions in file size. Here are examples of highly compressed GIS formats. ECW is a compressed image format typically for aerial and satellite imagery.

This GIS file type is known for its high compression ratios while still maintaining quality contrast in images. They are a wavelet compression with the latest JPG format giving an option for lossy or lossless compression. They are an optimal choice for background imagery because of its lossy compression. MrSIDs have impressive compression ratios.

Color images can be compressed at a ratio of over We store geographic data in various database file formats. Esri created the file geodatabase to be a container for storing multiple attribute tables, vector and raster data sets. File geodatabases offer structural and performance advantages. They have fast performance, versatile relationships, compatible storage for rasters, improved spatial indexes, data compression, customizable configuration, and 1 terabyte file size restrictions.

Within a geodatabase, geographic datasets are referred to as feature classes. But geodatabases can store more complex data such as networks, raster mosaics, and feature data sets.

Personal vs File Geodatabase. They used to be the most ubiquitous database type for managing geospatial data. Personal geodatabases were advantageous because you could manage multiple attribute tables, vector and raster datasets and create relationship classes.

But their biggest drawback was their limited 2GB in storage capacity. Whereas file geodatabases offer 2TB of capacity. GPKG are self-contained serverless SQLite databases that can contain anything from vector, tiles, rasters, layer attributes, and even extensions.

The file format is based on a SQLite database. The only coordinate system MBTiles support is spherical Mercator. Smallworld software is widely used in electrical, telecommunication, gas, water and utilities. VMDS stores multiple types of raster and vector geometries in spatial and topological utility networks.

They are also capable of querying and analysis in GE Smallworld. SpatiaLite uses the SQLite database engine. They are open source and lightweight with the ability to hold spatial and non-spatial files in a single file container. They also support versioned editing, backups, and recovery of an enterprise database over the same network.

With support for different geometry types, the PostGIS spatial database allows querying and managing information about locations and mapping. ArcSDE serves data in a centralized way over an entire organization using a relational database management system. End-users can access spatial data in an Esri environment and seamlessly edit and analyze data in an enterprise geodatabase.

As point cloud data, LiDAR is a dense network of coordinate points with elevation values. These GIS formats require specialized software or extensions to view or edit. The LAS file format is a binary file format specifically for the interchange between vendors and customers. The dense networks of coordinate point measurements are so large sometimes that they often need to be split to prevent the file size from becoming too large. You can save significant storage space using the LAZ file format.

Like most file compression, LAZ has no information loss. Through LAS datasets, you can visualize triangulated surfaces and perform statistical analysis. The first 3 columns generally represent X, Y and Z coordinates. Non-binary files like XYZ are advantageous because they can be opened and edited in a text editor.

Similar to other CAD design formats, engineers and architects use it for construction design. Elevation file formats are specific to digital elevation model products. They are widely used in the industry because of the high volume of legacy elevation models produced by the USGS.

The DEM format is a single file containing 3 record types. There are a few things that can be done to tune it in. If it is quicker there might be ways to configure it to exclude AutoCAD.

Another customer found that the size of the DST was increasing more than reasonable and was able to manually compress and remove erroneous data. Eventually found out that changing the “include in publish” status was what caused the bloat. Purchase details. So for some reason, it looks like changing the “include in publish” status at least in this particular SS is causing the bloat.

SSMPropEditor works for 30 days in trial mode with full functionality. If you purchased on or after April 25, the upgrade is free of charge. Current version is Purchase is also available through this site. Sign in with the same account used when purchasing. Both bit and bit. Contact us if there’s a need for support for older Windows versions.

Windows 8. The software runs stand-alone and does not require AutoCAD or other CAD software to be installed unless renaming of actual layout name should be done. Compatible with GstarCAD and newer.

DraftSight and newer. Use this link to purchase. If you have really many users that you want to give access to this software we can discuss a discounted price based on your particular situation.

Educational discounts available. The license is perpetual. Support and upgrades is included for a minimum of 2 years after purchase. If you have more than one computer and you are the only user of the application one license is enough. The network license system is available at no extra cost and normally most useful for companies with quite many licenses. The network license is priced the same but you basically need a license per user anyway as the license will be locked to that user for 4 weeks after last usage.

Reason is that this app is not such that you keep it running for an extended time. But the network license helps when you have many licenses as each computer does not need to be activated through us.

There is volume discount available with purchase of multiple licenses. If your company is tax exempt note that BlueSnap does not currently offer a way to prevent tax from being charged on orders.

We need a copy of the tax exempt certificate to refund the tax if already paid. When your purchase is completed you will get an email with the DST Converter download. Transcending cultural differences and customs is just a small step to achieve that. Online Dating Guide. No matter who you ask, you will get the same answer: dating nowadays is hard. For single expats in Germany, dating is even harder.

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Grid files are a proprietary format developed by Esri. Grids have no extension and are unique because they can hold attribute data in a raster file. But the catch is that you can only add attributes to integer grids. Attributes are stored in a value attribute table VAT — one record for each unique value in the grid, and the count representing the number of cells. The two types of Esri Grid files are integer and floating point grids. Land cover would be an example of a discrete grid. Each class has a unique integer cell value.

Elevation data is an example of a floating point grid. Each cell represents an elevation floating value. Lossy GIS compression reduces file size by permanently eliminating certain information, especially redundant information even though the user may not notice it. These lossy compression algorithms often result in greater reductions in file size. Here are examples of highly compressed GIS formats. ECW is a compressed image format typically for aerial and satellite imagery. This GIS file type is known for its high compression ratios while still maintaining quality contrast in images.

They are a wavelet compression with the latest JPG format giving an option for lossy or lossless compression. They are an optimal choice for background imagery because of its lossy compression. MrSIDs have impressive compression ratios. Color images can be compressed at a ratio of over We store geographic data in various database file formats. Esri created the file geodatabase to be a container for storing multiple attribute tables, vector and raster data sets.

File geodatabases offer structural and performance advantages. They have fast performance, versatile relationships, compatible storage for rasters, improved spatial indexes, data compression, customizable configuration, and 1 terabyte file size restrictions. Within a geodatabase, geographic datasets are referred to as feature classes. But geodatabases can store more complex data such as networks, raster mosaics, and feature data sets.

Personal vs File Geodatabase. They used to be the most ubiquitous database type for managing geospatial data. Personal geodatabases were advantageous because you could manage multiple attribute tables, vector and raster datasets and create relationship classes. But their biggest drawback was their limited 2GB in storage capacity. Whereas file geodatabases offer 2TB of capacity.

GPKG are self-contained serverless SQLite databases that can contain anything from vector, tiles, rasters, layer attributes, and even extensions. The file format is based on a SQLite database. The only coordinate system MBTiles support is spherical Mercator. Smallworld software is widely used in electrical, telecommunication, gas, water and utilities.

VMDS stores multiple types of raster and vector geometries in spatial and topological utility networks. They are also capable of querying and analysis in GE Smallworld. SpatiaLite uses the SQLite database engine. They are open source and lightweight with the ability to hold spatial and non-spatial files in a single file container. They also support versioned editing, backups, and recovery of an enterprise database over the same network.

With support for different geometry types, the PostGIS spatial database allows querying and managing information about locations and mapping.

ArcSDE serves data in a centralized way over an entire organization using a relational database management system. End-users can access spatial data in an Esri environment and seamlessly edit and analyze data in an enterprise geodatabase. As point cloud data, LiDAR is a dense network of coordinate points with elevation values. These GIS formats require specialized software or extensions to view or edit.

The LAS file format is a binary file format specifically for the interchange between vendors and customers. The dense networks of coordinate point measurements are so large sometimes that they often need to be split to prevent the file size from becoming too large. You can save significant storage space using the LAZ file format. Like most file compression, LAZ has no information loss. Through LAS datasets, you can visualize triangulated surfaces and perform statistical analysis.

The first 3 columns generally represent X, Y and Z coordinates. Non-binary files like XYZ are advantageous because they can be opened and edited in a text editor. Similar to other CAD design formats, engineers and architects use it for construction design.

Elevation file formats are specific to digital elevation model products. They are widely used in the industry because of the high volume of legacy elevation models produced by the USGS. Dating Tips. Register Login Language: English en. Register to contact people from your country living in Germany just like you! Dating site for Expats in Germany Finding love is a challenging quest even in your home country. Online dating guide for expats Living in Germany is an incredible opportunity to rediscover and reinvent yourself, including the romantic side of your life.

Why dating for expats in Germany? Sales Information: sales thunderheadeng. These all represent your current model. If an object is added, removed, or selected in one view, the other views will simultaneously reflect the change.

The navigation view is a tree-like view on the left side of the PyroSim main window. An example of this view in use is shown in Figure 2.

When you right-click on an item in this view, a list of the functions PyroSim can perform on that item is shown. To rearrange objects in the Navigation view, make a selection and then drag the object s to the new location.

Use the 3D view to rapidly obtain a visual image of the model and perform some drafting. In this view, the user can navigate through the model in 3D and select objects. In addition, any drafting that requires objects to be snapped to faces of other objects, such as drawing a vent on an obstruction or attaching a measuring device to a solid can be easily achieved in this view. For more information on drafting, see Chapter 9. The traditional orthographic views are pre-programmed into PyroSim and are valid in both the 3D and 2D views.

It is also possible to save custom camera views, for more information, see Chapter 3. To change the camera view, select the desired view in the drop-down menu, as shown in Figure 3 or press the appropriate hotkey from Table 1. There are several tools that can be used to navigate the model and select objects. The tools for the 3D view are found in the navigation toolbar above the 3D view as shown in Figure 4.

The model can also be zoomed in and out with any of the navigation tools by using the scroll wheel. Scrolling up zooms in and scrolling down zooms out. With all but the Roam Tool , using the scroll wheel will zoom in on the point under the cursor. With the Roam Tool , the scroll wheel only zooms the center of the view. Resetting the view also has the effect of changing the orbit center when orbiting.

Orbiting is the action of spinning the camera about its focal point, which is the center of the model or center of the selection, depending on which reset action was last performed. By default, orbit works as if there is an invisible sphere around the model on which you click and drag the mouse to spin. Alternatively, orbiting can be performed similarly to Smokeview by going to the View menu and selecting, Use Smokeview-like Navigation.

In this mode the camera spins about the Z axis with left and right mouse movements and about the local X axis with up and down movements. There are several ways to filter the objects shown in the 3D view.

To use clipping, the user must first define floors for the model as discussed in Section 8. Once the floors are defined, a floor can be selected by using the Floor Drop-down above the 3D or 2D view as shown in Figure 7.

Once a floor has been selected, its clipping planes will be applied to the entire scene to only show objects within the clipping region.

Filtering can also be performed using the filter toolbar buttons as shown in Figure 8. Filtering can also be applied to meshes but in a slightly different way. This toolbar selectively allows viewing mesh grid lines, mesh boundaries, and mesh outlines. Filtering mesh elements shows the different mesh elements.

Figure 10 shows the grid lines, Figure 11 shows the boundary, and Figure 12 shows the outline. The 2D view is mostly the same as the 3D view with some key differences:. This view is divided into two sections, the Model Records and the Additional Records. This read only sections allows the user to see an exact copy of the file that will be input into the FDS simulator based on their current model.

Other settings related to the file display can be toggled through the Preferences menu item. Due to the complexity of the FDS simulator, it is difficult to support all possible records and input files. Images of the current display can be saved to a file by opening the File menu and clicking Snapshot. The user can specify the file name, image type png, jpg, tif, bmp , and the resolution. A good choice for image type is Portable Network Graphics png.

PyroSim preferences can be set by going to the File menu and choosing Preferences. Any changes to the preferences will be set for the current PyroSim session and be remembered the next time PyroSim is started. These describe global PyroSim preferences as shown in Figure The Keyboard Shortcuts dialog is launched from the PyroSim preferences panel. To change the keybinding for an action, click the value in the Key Press column. This launches an editor window Figure 15 with four options.

Some keyboard shortcuts are used by Java UI components. If a shortcut does not result in the expected behavior, it may be in direct conflict with a preexisting Java shortcut. It is best practice to avoid these conflicts Default Swing key bindings. They can be seen in Figure These preferences define advanced 2D and 3D display properties, as shown in Figure They can be used to improve display performance on complex models, but they tend to create problems for some older graphics cards, including crashing.

For this reason, they are turned off when running in safe mode. PyroSim stores data related to user preferences in a file called PyroSim. By default, this file can be found in one of the following locations. If at least one of these files exists, PyroSim will use it to load the user preferences.

The PROPS file is stored in a plaintext format, and can be viewed or edited with any conventional text editor. While it is not recommended to edit the file directly, some troubleshooting techniques may involve deleting the PROPS file so that a new one can be created from scratch by PyroSim. Configurations for hotkeys in PyroSim is stored in a separate file named keybindings.

Models can be created in either English or Metric units. To select a system of units, on the View menu, click Units , then click the desired unit. PyroSim will automatically convert your previous input values into the unit system you select. The Record View will always display values in the appropriate FDS units, regardless of what unit system you choose to work in. The custom color scheme is defined in the PyroSim. PyroSim provides the capability to save and recall view state from the 3D and 2D views in an object called a View.

Views can also be used to specify clipping regions that limit the amount of the model shown in the 3D and 2D views. Views appear in the Navigation View as shown in Figure There can be multiple views in a model, but at any given time, there is always one active view. A new model will always start with one default view that has no view state associated with it.

State can be added to the view as described in the sections, Section 3. Views are managed in the navigation view. From there, they can be created, deleted, grouped, rearranged, etc. This will add a new view to the model, saving the current camera viewpoint and section box into the new view see the following sections to learn more about viewpoints and section boxes.

The new view will become the active view. To delete a view, select it in the navigation view and in the Edit menu, select Delete. A view can only be deleted if it is not active.

View settings can be copied or moved between views. To copy settings such as the viewpoint or section box select Copy , located in either the navigation view or in the Edit menu. To paste the settings to another view, select the desired target view and in the Edit menu select Paste.

To move settings from one view to another, in the navigation view, drag the setting to the desired view. Each view can have one viewpoint associated with it. When a viewpoint is saved, the current navigation tool is also saved with the view Orbit , Roam , etc. A viewpoint appears in the navigation view as a child item of a view and is labelled Viewpoint.

This can be seen in Figure 20 for the two views, Inside and Section. A viewpoint is automatically saved to newly created views. A viewpoint can also be explicitly saved in one of the following ways:. A viewpoint can be removed from a view by selecting the item, Viewpoint, in the navigation view and deleting it. A section box may also be added to a view. A section box is a convex region defined by six sides that is used to limit the scope of visible geometry. All geometry outside the box is clipped from view.

An example of the clipping is shown below. A section box is displayed as a dashed outline of the region. Each section box has a color associated with it that is used to display both the outline of the section box and the clipped portions of solid, clipped objects as shown in Effect of a Section Box , Figure In this figure, the section box is green, so any geometry that is clipped including the walls and slab in the image are also colored green.

The scope of a section box can be edited by selecting the section box and manipulating it like any other geometric object, see Section 9. Section boxes can also be rotated and moved like other geometric items, see Section 9. The properties of a section box can be edited by either double-clicking the section box or by right-clicking it and selecting Properties.

The display for the section box can be independently hidden from view by de-selecting Show Section Boxes in the View menu. A section box can also be reset to encompass the currently visible objects by performing one of the following:. Smokeview supports the concept of viewpoints, which are similar to PyroSim views. Smokeview viewpoints are defined by camera position, orientation, a navigation tool, and up to six axis-aligned clipping planes.

Viewpoints are stored in the Smokeview INI file. It does not write the views to the Smokeview INI file. This is to avoid view duplication in the 3D Results. This behavior can be changed, however, by turning off the Views file in the preferences, see Section 2. At any time, the view information can be updated for the results without re-running the simulation by explicitly writing either the PyroSim Views file or the Smokeview INI file.

In addition, if a view was saved in PyroSim with the Roam tool active, the Rotation type in Smokeview is set to Eye centered. For all other navigation tools, the Rotation type in Smokeview is set to 2 axis. Smokeview viewpoints may also be imported into PyroSim. This is useful if additional views have been specified in Smokeview while viewing the results and those viewpoints should be preserved in PyroSim.

To import Smokeview viewpoints, perform the following:. After importing, a new view group is added, containing one PyroSim view for each Smokeview viewpoint that was in the INI file. Several files are used when performing a fire analysis using PyroSim. This section describes how to load and save files in the formats supported by PyroSim.

When PyroSim is started, it begins with an empty model. You can close the current model and create a new empty model by opening the File menu and clicking New. PyroSim always has one and only one active model.

The PyroSim model contains all the information needed to write an FDS input file, as well as additional information such as obstruction grouping, floor heights, background images, and textures. This format is ideal for sharing your models with other PyroSim users. A list of recently opened files is also available. PyroSim has an auto-save feature which stores a copy of your current model every 10 minutes.

This file is automatically deleted if PyroSim exits normally, but if PyroSim crashes, you can recover your work by opening the autosave file. It can be found either in the same directory as your most recent PSM file, or in the PyroSim installation directory if your model was unsaved.

For more information about opening files saved with previous versions of PyroSim, please refer to Appendix A and Appendix B. PyroSim supports write protection for a model. When write protection is enabled, users cannot modify a model e.

This option can be enabled with or without password protection. If a model is write-protected, PyroSim will display notification in the application title bar. The model will now be write-protected. Since a password was not used, a password will not be required to remove write protection.

PyroSim allows you to import existing FDS input files. During import, PyroSim will check for the validity of each record. If errors are detected, you will be notified. You may then make the required corrections and attempt to import the file again. PyroSim supports file import for versions 4, 5, and 6 of FDS. PyroSim also allows you to explicitly export the current model to an FDS input file.

You can manually edit the file to take advantage of advanced FDS features, or to easily transfer the input file to a different machine or special version of FDS.

Each type of file provides a variety of geometry that can either be directly represented as obstructions or as drawing guides in the PyroSim model. This is useful when there is one blueprint per floor of a building or a 3D building has been split into several sections, each in a separate file.

STL files will import as shown in Section 4. For non-STL files, a step-by-step dialog will open as shown in Figure When PyroSim imports a CAD file, it will treat all 3D face data as obstructions and all other data lines, curves, etc.

These objects will be represented as FDS geometry. With the exception of IFC files, all other entities and objects from other CAD formats that contain faces are treated as collections of thin obstructions by PyroSim. They cannot be reliably treated as solid since there is no guarantee that their faces form a closed and non-self-intersecting shell or that this would even be desired.

Once the file is imported, PyroSim creates a hierarchy of groups and objects, such that there is one top group, named after the file. The next levels depend on the imported file type. Under each layer group there are one or more objects representing the entities in the file. The following illustrates the hierarchy as it would appear in the Navigation View :.

PyroSim can also import objects from STL files, which are simply listings of triangles. Usually, each STL file represents the shell of one 3D solid object. Because the STL file is simply a listing of triangles, there may be more than one object represented in the file. PyroSim will use the vertex weld tolerance to detect triangle connectivity and determine if there are several, disconnected sets of faces in the file.

If there are, there will be one resulting PyroSim object per connected set of faces. In addition, if the solid option is enabled or the objects are being treated as holes, import will only succeed if each face set is detected as a closed shell by PyroSim.

Each method has advantages and disadvantages as discussed below. Some CAD files contain 2D floor plans, which, on their own, cannot be used in a simulation. These types of files must first be converted into solid 3D geometry. There are two ways in which this can be accomplished. The first involves using the floor plan as a guide to draw the 3D model. See Chapter 9 for more information. The second is to convert lines that represent walls into 3D walls using automated tools.

This can be done as follows:. All FDS calculations are performed within computational meshes. Every object in the simulation e. Any object that extends beyond the boundary of the physical domain is cut off at the boundary. There is no penalty for defining objects outside of the domain, but these objects do not appear in the Results.

To achieve optimal simulation accuracy, it is important to use mesh cells that are approximately the same size in all three directions. A side effect of this approach is that optimal mesh divisions are constrained to the form 2 u 3 v 5 w , where u, v and w are integers.

However, 37, 99 and are not. In addition, using a prime number of cells along an axis may cause undesirable results. PyroSim warns when the number of divisions is not optimal. The resulting meshes are displayed below. The term “multiple meshes” means that the computational domain consists of more than one rectangular mesh, usually connected, although this is not required. In each mesh, the governing equations can be solved with a time step based on the flow speed within that particular mesh.

Some reasons for using multiple meshes include:. Meshes can overlap, abut, or not touch at all. In the last case, essentially two separate calculations are performed with no communication at all between them. Obstructions and vents are entered in terms of the overall coordinate system and need not apply to any one particular mesh. Each mesh checks the coordinates of all the geometric entities and decides whether or not they are to be included.

To simplify working with multiple meshes, PyroSim provides the following additional mesh operations:. To use any of the above actions, select one or more meshes, right-click to open a popup menu, then click the desired mesh action. To simulate a surface made of heat-conducting solids or a fuel you must specify a material that describes certain thermal properties and pyrolysis behavior. PyroSim offers two categories of materials: solid materials and liquid fuels.

To create a new material, you can use the Edit Materials dialog. On the Model menu, click Edit Materials. Examples of solid materials include brick, gypsum board, and upholstery. To create a solid material:. After following these steps, a default solid material will be created.

Text entered in the Description box will not affect the simulation, but will be preserved in the FDS input file using the FYI field of the material. Including a description of the material is recommended. The Pyrolysis tab provides options to set the heat of combustion and add reactions that will be used to govern how the material burns.

Each material can have a maximum of 10 reactions. To add a reaction, click the Add button. This will open a dialog to edit the new reaction. It provides the following options:. The thermal properties tab for liquid fuels is identical to the thermal properties tab for solid fuels, see Section 6. Surfaces are used to define the properties of solid objects and vents in your FDS model. The surface can use previously defined materials in mixtures or layers.

By default, all solid objects and vents are inert, with a temperature that is fixed at the ambient temperature set in the Simulation Parameters dialog. In addition to defining heat conduction in a solid, surfaces can also be used to define a burner, specify the ignition temperature for an object, give a vent a supply velocity, and set the many other properties supported by FDS.

To create, modify, and delete surfaces, you can use the Edit Surfaces dialog. The dialog in Figure 35 shows the dialog being used to edit an upholstery surface. These surfaces cannot be changed and are present in every analysis. This surface remains fixed at the ambient temperature. This surface is used only for vents on the exterior mesh boundary. It is intended to be applied to an entire mesh boundary to symmetrically double the size of the domain. PyroSim aids the user by organizing the surface options into logical types, such as a burner to define a simple fire or a layered surface to represent a solid, heat conducting wall.

The Edit Surfaces dialog helps define a surface type with a set of tabs. Each tab provides a collection of input fields and settings for the user to customize that surface type. Air leak surfaces can be used to create a permeable barrier between two pressure zones, defined by the Leak Path in the Edit Surfaces dialog. The leak area is defined by the zones selected. It allows you to customize the description, color, and texture of the inert surface described in Reserved Surfaces.

Exhaust surfaces can be used to remove gas from the simulation domain. The specification of their air movement parameters is identical to that of a supply surface, but instead of the velocity or flux driving air into the domain, they are pulling air out. Exhaust surfaces do not have the option to apply injection or geometry properties. Tabs: Advanced , Air Flow , Thermal. The General Surface type is a hybrid between the Burner and Supply surface types.

Adding a little more flexibility than either of them individually. This surface type represents a radiative heat source. The options are identical to the options for a burner without the heat release options. If the surface temperature is less than the ambient temperature, the surface will remove heat from the surrounding gases.

Layered surfaces are composed of one or more material definitions. Materials include solid and liquid substances such as concrete, pine, and ethanol. For more information about materials and how they can be specified in PyroSim, please refer to Chapter 6.

This type of surface is ideal for walls and other objects that are composed of real-world materials. This surface type can also be used to inject extra non-reactive species into the simulation. This surface represents a vent that injects air into the simulation domain. The temperature of the air injected by supply vents can be controlled using settings on the thermal tab.

Species Injection options are available if the Specify Mass Flux of Individual Species option in the Air Flow group is selected and there are extra, non-reactive species present in the simulation. Each tab of the Edit Surfaces dialog provides a set of inputs and settings that can be used to build a custom surface type as listed in Section 7.

The following sections describe the parameters on each tab and are listed in alphabetical order, not the order they might appear for a surface type. The reaction used to model a given surface can either be taken from the material specifications, or given explicitly by the surface. Manually specifying the parameters will produce a surface similar to a burner. You can inject extra non-reactive species into the simulation using the species injection options.

To use these options, you must first specify species using the Edit Species dialog. You can add textures to surfaces to increase the realism of your model. This can be done through the use of Appearance objects. An Appearance defines how the surfaces of objects will appear and can have colors or textures applied to them. Some default appearances are provided or you can import your own. The Room Fire example demonstrates using a wood texture for a pine floor and hanging a picture on a wall.

Your textures will be automatically displayed in PyroSim. Appearances will be shown on obstructions and vents when the View Mode is either Realistic or Realistic with Outlines. Appearances can also be viewed by going to the Model menu and selecting Edit Appearances.

Geometry can either be created through dialogs or by using the drafting tools in the 2D or 3D views as discussed in Chapter 9. The user can also organize the model by creating floors and groups. In addition, the user can assign background images to floors to aid in drafting. Obstructions are the fundamental geometric representation in FDS. To avoid incompatibilities, please uninstall them before using Enscape.

The system requirements to run Enscape, as well as the Standalone Executable files that can be exported from Enscape, are identical. It is also recommended that your internet connection is fast and stable, and that you should use a direct cable connection and avoid using a Wi-fi connection where possible, as this can slow down the Asset Library loading times. If using Revit, there are known conflicts with two other Revit plugins: Colorizer and Techviz.

Please let us know if you experience any issues when running Enscape under this operating system by submitting feedback via the Enscape Feedback Form. Enscape should work if your GPU is capable of running the minimum recommended drivers listed below. Although we always advise that you should be running the latest available drivers for your GPU, sometimes the latest available GPU drivers can cause unforeseen issues and in such a case we strongly advise that you roll back to the drivers listed here:.

There are plenty of different system configurations and we are working every day to support more of them. Yes No.

Thunderhead Engineering makes no warranty, autodesk revit 2015 operating system unsupported free ysstem implied, to users of PyroSim, and accepts no responsibility for its use. Users autodesk revit 2015 operating system unsupported free PyroSim assume sole responsibility under Federal law for determining the appropriateness of its use in any particular application, for any conclusions drawn from the results of its use, and for any actions taken or not taken as a result of analyses performed using these tools.

Users are warned that PyroSim is intended for use only by those competent in the fields of fluid aurodesk, thermodynamics, combustion, and heat transfer, and is intended only to supplement the informed judgment of the qualified user. The software package is a revlt model that may or may not have ahtodesk capability when applied to a specific set of factual circumstances.

Lack of accurate predictions by the model could lead to erroneous conclusions with regard to fire safety. All results should be evaluated by an informed user. All other undupported or company names that are mentioned autodesk revit 2015 operating system unsupported free this publication are tradenames, trademarks, or registered trademarks of their respective owners.

Throughout this document, the mention of computer hardware or commercial software does not constitute endorsement by Thunderhead Engineering, nor does rveit indicate that the products are necessarily those best suited for the intended purpose.

They have been gracious in their responses to our many questions. We would like to gratefully acknowledge the RJA Group for their collaboration with Thunderhead engineering in the development of PyroSim. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the authors and do not rrevit reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

PyroSim FDS is closely integrated into PyroSim. FDS models can predict autodesk revit 2015 operating system unsupported free, temperature, carbon monoxide, and other substances during fires. The results of these simulations are used to ensure the safety of buildings before construction, evaluate safety options of existing autodesk revit 2015 operating system unsupported free, reconstruct fires for post-accident investigation, and assist in firefighter training.

FDS simulates fire scenarios using computational fluid dynamics CFD optimized for low-speed, thermally-driven flow. This approach is very flexible and can be applied to fires ranging from stove-tops to oil storage tanks. Autodssk can also model situations that do not include a fire, such as ventilation in buildings. The PyroSim interface provides immediate input feedback and ensures the correct format for the FDS input file. You can download the current version, sign up for a free trial, and purchase the software from the PyroSim Support Page.

This page also provides instructions for installation and activation. Troubleshooting info can be found on the PyroSim Answers page. There is no functional difference between the autodesk revit 2015 operating system unsupported free version of PyroSim and the full version, the only limitation is the trial license duration. When installing PyroSim, the installer will either upgrade an existing version or install PyroSim to a new location, this behavior is based on the version.

In the case of minor updates e. When installing a major update e. PyroSim to PyroSimthe older http://replace.me/24824.txt will not be modified and the newer version will be installed to a different folder. Administrator privileges are required to install PyroSim. This is necessary because the installer adds processes to the operating system for license management and parallel FDS simulation.

PyroSim will regularly check for and notify the user of available updates to the software when configured to do so. By default, PyroSim will check for updates on startup and display the relevant information in the Check For Updates dialog when one is available.

The dialog can be disabled on startup by unchecking Check for newer version on startup. In this section we operting some autodesk revit 2015 operating system unsupported free that unsupportdd help speed your model development. The big issues most users will face are: selecting a mesh, defining your geometry, selecting a reaction, and defining the correct boundary conditions.

The analyst will always unsuported to balance solution time and accuracy. Reducing the mesh size by a factor of 2, will result in approximately a factor of 16 more computation time a factor of 8 due to the number of cells and an additional factor of 2 due to reduced step size. An example of a convergence study for jet fans no fire can be found in the series of posts Modeling Jet Fans found on the PyroSim Tutorials web page.

Here the solution autodesk revit 2015 operating system unsupported free compared with experimental data. In some problems the mesh resolution must be selected freee adequately represent the geometry.

An example where geometry controlled autodesi mesh size is the modeling of a wood crib where each stick had a small diameter see Modeling Fire, Part 4 — Combustion with HRR, Ignition, and Burn Away on the Thunderhead website. By default, no reaction is specified, a reaction is only needed if there will be a fire in the simulation. A limited number of reactions are included in FDS and can be added from the library.

Parallel processing can speed the solution. In general, our autodesk revit 2015 operating system unsupported free indicates that running autodesk revit 2015 operating system unsupported free multiple cores on the same computer offers читать больше most significant improvement.

Using multiple computers in a cluster can autodeso it possible to solve larger problems, but the communication delays between computers tend to cancel frer speed improvement of parallel processing.

The good news is that that standard installation of PyroSim includes support for parallel processing on the same computer. PyroSim includes tools to manage multiple meshes. Unupported effective strategy is to first define источник статьи single autodesj that spans the entire model.

Then use unsupportef PyroSim mesh splitting tool to create multiple meshes. You can then change the resolution of selected meshes using the Refine Mesh option and all the meshes will autodes, stay correctly aligned.

All geometry in FDS is defined at the mesh 201. Even if you input the geometry of an obstruction or vent to lie between cell autodesk revit 2015 operating system unsupported free points, when FDS runs the solution, all the geometry will be “snapped” to the grid.

If you are drawing your own geometry in PyroSim, you can select the Snap to Model Grids option that will ensure that your geometry matches the grid. You can also ensure that objects will fill entire grid cells rather than a cell face by turning on the Thicken option in the obstruction properties, see Section 8.

In autodeak experience, numerical instabilities that may occur during aitodesk solution are the result of an error in the model, not an error in FDS. The numerical instability typically arises due to either a pressure increase or decrease in a mesh.

If you see this приведу ссылку, add a pressure sensor to your model and see what is happening to the написать thank you for installing microsoft office professional plus 2013 free download прощения. Problems typically occur because of how boundary conditions have been defined.

Sales Information: sales thunderheadeng. These all represent your current model. If an object is added, removed, or selected in one view, the other views will simultaneously reflect the change. The navigation view is a tree-like view on the left side of the PyroSim main window. An example of this view in use is shown in Figure 2.

When you right-click on an item in this view, opdrating list of the functions PyroSim can perform on that item is shown. To rearrange objects in the Navigation view, make a selection and then drag the object s to the new location.

Use the 3D view to rapidly obtain a visual image of the model and perform some drafting. In this view, the user autodesk revit 2015 operating system unsupported free navigate through the model in 3D and select objects. In addition, any drafting that requires objects sydtem be snapped to faces of other objects, such as drawing a vent on an obstruction unsuplorted attaching a measuring device to a solid can be easily achieved in this view.

For more information on drafting, see Chapter 9. The traditional orthographic views are pre-programmed into PyroSim and are valid in both the 3D and 2D autodesk revit 2015 operating system unsupported free. It is also possible to save custom camera views, for more information, see Chapter 3. To change the camera frfe, select gevit desired view in the drop-down menu, as shown in Figure 3 or press the appropriate hotkey from Table 1.

There are several tools that can be used to navigate the model and select objects. The tools for the 3D view are found in the navigation toolbar above the 3D view operatlng shown in Figure 4. The model can also be zoomed in and freee with any of the navigation tools by using the scroll wheel. Scrolling up жмите сюда in and scrolling down zooms out. With all but the Roam Toolusing the scroll wheel will zoom in on the point under the cursor.

With the Roam Toolthe scroll wheel only zooms the center of the view. Resetting operafing view also has the effect of changing the orbit center when frew. Orbiting is sytem action of spinning the camera about its focal point, which is the center of the model or center of the selection, depending on which reset action was last performed. By default, orbit works as autodesk revit 2015 operating system unsupported free there syshem an invisible sphere around the model on which you click and drag the mouse to spin.

Alternatively, orbiting can be performed similarly to Smokeview by going to the View menu and selecting, Use Smokeview-like Navigation. In this mode the camera spins about the Z axis with left and right mouse movements and about the local X axis with up по этой ссылке down movements. There are several ways to filter the objects shown in the 3D view. To use clipping, the user must first define floors for the model as cree in Section 8.

Once the floors are defined, a floor can be selected by using the Floor Drop-down above the 3D or 2D http://replace.me/20756.txt as shown in Figure autodesk revit 2015 operating system unsupported free.

Once a floor has been selected, its clipping planes will be applied to the entire scene to only unspported objects within the clipping region. Filtering can also be performed using the filter toolbar buttons as shown in Figure 8. Filtering can also operwting applied to meshes but in a slightly different way.

This toolbar selectively allows viewing mesh grid lines, mesh boundaries, and mesh outlines. Filtering mesh elements shows the different mesh elements.

Figure 10 shows the grid lines, Figure 11 shows the boundary, and Figure 12 shows the outline. The 2D view is mostly the same as the 3D view with some key differences:. This view is divided into two sections, the Model Records and the Additional Records. This read only sections allows the user to see an exact copy of the file that will be input into the FDS simulator based on their current model.

Other settings related to the file display can be toggled through the Preferences menu item. Due to the atodesk of the FDS simulator, it is difficult to support all possible records and input files.

Images of the current display can be saved to a file by opening the File menu and clicking Snapshot. The user can specify the file name, image type png, jpg, tif, bmpand the resolution.

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Grid files are a proprietary format developed by Esri. Grids have no extension and are unique because they can hold attribute data in a raster file. But the catch is that you can only add attributes to integer grids.

Attributes are stored in a value attribute table VAT — one record for each unique value in the grid, and the count representing the number of cells.

The two types of Esri Grid files are integer and floating point grids. Land cover would be an example of a discrete grid. Each class has a unique integer cell value. Elevation data is an example of a floating point grid. Each cell represents an elevation floating value. Lossy GIS compression reduces file size by permanently eliminating certain information, especially redundant information even though the user may not notice it.

These lossy compression algorithms often result in greater reductions in file size. Here are examples of highly compressed GIS formats. ECW is a compressed image format typically for aerial and satellite imagery. This GIS file type is known for its high compression ratios while still maintaining quality contrast in images. They are a wavelet compression with the latest JPG format giving an option for lossy or lossless compression.

They are an optimal choice for background imagery because of its lossy compression. MrSIDs have impressive compression ratios. Color images can be compressed at a ratio of over We store geographic data in various database file formats. Esri created the file geodatabase to be a container for storing multiple attribute tables, vector and raster data sets. File geodatabases offer structural and performance advantages.

They have fast performance, versatile relationships, compatible storage for rasters, improved spatial indexes, data compression, customizable configuration, and 1 terabyte file size restrictions. Within a geodatabase, geographic datasets are referred to as feature classes. But geodatabases can store more complex data such as networks, raster mosaics, and feature data sets.

Personal vs File Geodatabase. They used to be the most ubiquitous database type for managing geospatial data. Personal geodatabases were advantageous because you could manage multiple attribute tables, vector and raster datasets and create relationship classes. But their biggest drawback was their limited 2GB in storage capacity. Whereas file geodatabases offer 2TB of capacity.

GPKG are self-contained serverless SQLite databases that can contain anything from vector, tiles, rasters, layer attributes, and even extensions. The file format is based on a SQLite database. The only coordinate system MBTiles support is spherical Mercator. Smallworld software is widely used in electrical, telecommunication, gas, water and utilities. VMDS stores multiple types of raster and vector geometries in spatial and topological utility networks.

They are also capable of querying and analysis in GE Smallworld. SpatiaLite uses the SQLite database engine. They are open source and lightweight with the ability to hold spatial and non-spatial files in a single file container. They also support versioned editing, backups, and recovery of an enterprise database over the same network. With support for different geometry types, the PostGIS spatial database allows querying and managing information about locations and mapping.

ArcSDE serves data in a centralized way over an entire organization using a relational database management system. End-users can access spatial data in an Esri environment and seamlessly edit and analyze data in an enterprise geodatabase.

As point cloud data, LiDAR is a dense network of coordinate points with elevation values. These GIS formats require specialized software or extensions to view or edit. The LAS file format is a binary file format specifically for the interchange between vendors and customers. The dense networks of coordinate point measurements are so large sometimes that they often need to be split to prevent the file size from becoming too large.

You can save significant storage space using the LAZ file format. Like most file compression, LAZ has no information loss. Through LAS datasets, you can visualize triangulated surfaces and perform statistical analysis. The first 3 columns generally represent X, Y and Z coordinates.

Non-binary files like XYZ are advantageous because they can be opened and edited in a text editor. Similar to other CAD design formats, engineers and architects use it for construction design. Elevation file formats are specific to digital elevation model products. They are widely used in the industry because of the high volume of legacy elevation models produced by the USGS. Living in Germany is an incredible opportunity to rediscover and reinvent yourself, including the romantic side of your life.

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Purchase details. So for some reason, it looks like changing the “include in publish” status at least in this particular SS is causing the bloat. SSMPropEditor works for 30 days in trial mode with full functionality. If you purchased on or after April 25, the upgrade is free of charge. Current version is Purchase is also available through this site. Sign in with the same account used when purchasing. Both bit and bit. Contact us if there’s a need for support for older Windows versions.

Windows 8. The software runs stand-alone and does not require AutoCAD or other CAD software to be installed unless renaming of actual layout name should be done. Compatible with GstarCAD and newer.

DraftSight and newer. Use this link to purchase. If you have really many users that you want to give access to this software we can discuss a discounted price based on your particular situation.

Educational discounts available. The license is perpetual. Support and upgrades is included for a minimum of 2 years after purchase. If you have more than one computer and you are the only user of the application one license is enough. The network license system is available at no extra cost and normally most useful for companies with quite many licenses.

The network license is priced the same but you basically need a license per user anyway as the license will be locked to that user for 4 weeks after last usage. Reason is that this app is not such that you keep it running for an extended time. But the network license helps when you have many licenses as each computer does not need to be activated through us. There is volume discount available with purchase of multiple licenses.

If your company is tax exempt note that BlueSnap does not currently offer a way to prevent tax from being charged on orders. We need a copy of the tax exempt certificate to refund the tax if already paid.

When your purchase is completed you will get an email with the DST Converter download. The license is perpetual as a minimum for the version available when purchased and support is included.

While smaller segments will make the wall look better in PyroSim, placement of obstructions generated for FDS depends on the resolution of your mesh.

A curved wall drawn with three different segment lengths created with this technique are shown below. Using extremely short line segments will probably not be of any benefit unless you also use very small mesh cells. This technique forces you to convert the curve to blocks manually, but the advantage is you know exactly what geometry will be generated for FDS.

If you have a high resolution mesh, it may be useful to drag the mouse and “paint” the curve rather than clicking individual blocks. The example curved wall is shown in Figure To create curved objects using the rotation technique, you must place an initial segment, then perform a rotate-copy operation about the center point of your desired curve. If we would have created 60 copies instead of 15 this procedure would have created a cylinder. While complicated, the rotation approach is the most effective at creating complex symmetrical geometry.

Trusses can be created by drawing a single truss out of slab obstructions and slab holes, then replicating that truss as many times as needed as shown in Figure You can quickly add a roof to the model using the Slab Obstruction Tool. The extruded polygon tool can be used to create obstructions with any number of boundary points triangles, quads, etc.

Users can create simple stairways by placing the initial stair, then using the translate-copy operation.

This section will present a simple example to illustrate the approach. We will create a 10 step stairway. Each step will have a 7 inch rise 0.

The stairway itself will be 24 inches 2. To keep things as simple as possible, we will construct the stairway in an empty model. PyroSim relies heavily on the idea of selected objects. For almost all operations, the user first selects an object s and then changes the selected object s.

The Selection Tool is used to select objects. Selection can be made in any of the views using the Selection tool. Multiple objects can be selected using the Ctrl key or click and drag to define a box.

In the Navigation View, the Shift key can be used to select a consecutive list of objects. A right-click on a selection displays a context menu. This menu includes the most common options for working with the object. The user may also right-click on individual objects for immediate display of the context menu.

Alternately, right-click on an object to display the context menu with Copy. Alternately, right-click on an object to display the context menu with Paste. By running two instances of PyroSim, you can copy objects from one model and paste them into a second model.

If the copied objects rely on other properties, such as surfaces, that are not included in the second model, these properties will be pasted into the model when the objects are pasted.

For example the user can select an object in PyroSim, open a text file, and paste the object. The text FDS representations of the object and dependent properties will be pasted. The object will be added to the PyroSim model. An error message will be received if the pasted object depends on data that is not available in the PyroSim model.

The user will then need to paste that information such as surface properties first before pasting the geometric object. The Translate dialog can be used to both move an object and to create copies of an object, each offset in space. The Mode selects either the option to move only the selected object or to create copies of the object and move them. The Offset parameters indicate the increment to move or offset the copies. To preview the changes without applying them, click Preview.

To apply the changes and close the dialog, click OK. To cancel the changes instead, click Cancel. The Mirror dialog can be used to mirror an object about a plane or planes.

To mirror an object in this manner, perform the following:. The Mode selects either the option to mirror only the selected object or to create a mirrored copy of the object. The Mirror Plane s define planes normal to the X, Y, and Z axes about which the object will be mirrored. The Use Center button can be used to fill the Mirror Plane data with the center coordinates of the selected objects.

The Scale dialog can be used to change the size of an object. To scale an object, perform the following:. The Mode selects either the option to scale only the selected object or to create multiple scaled copies of the object. The Scale values define the scale factors in the X, Y, and Z directions. The Base Point defines the point about which the scaling will be performed. The Use Center button can be used to fill the Base Point data with the center coordinates of the selected objects.

The Mode selects either the option to rotate only the selected object or to create multiple rotated copies of the object. The Rotation values allow the user to select the axis about which the rotation will be made and the angle is the rotation angle counter-clockwise is positive.

The Base Point defines the point about which the rotation will be performed. Often it is desirable to turn off the display of selected objects, for example, to hide a roof of a building in order to visualize the interior.

In any of the views, right-click on a selection to obtain the following options:. Gas species can serve many different roles in a PyroSim model. In the simplest applications, a number of gaseous species are implicitly defined and tracked within the simulator to model the combustion of hydrocarbon fuels.

By default, PyroSim adds all species which have been implicitly defined by FDS to the model on startup. These species are unique from those involved in the reaction chemistry, and will not take part in the simple reaction chemistry if referenced.

While PyroSim manually handles the logic that determines whether or not it is necessary to include a species in the FDS input file, it is important to understand what requires a species line be written to the output.

A species referenced by any of the following will cause it to be written:. Three different classifications of species type can be created in a PyroSim model.

The second type are custom primitive species. These differ from predefined species in that they must have their chemical properties defined.

And lastly, there are custom lumped species, which are defined as either a mass or volume fraction of predefined and custom primitive species. Species can be managed by opening the Model menu and selecting Edit Species. To create either a new species, or include a predefined one, select New and choose whether the species should be Predefined, Primitive, or Lumped. Primitive species can be tracked individually, or as a component of a more complex lumped species.

Species mixtures can be defined as a mixture of any number of primitive species. Because all species in the simulation must be tracked by a transport equation, a lumped species can be used to save on simulation time. When using lumped species, it is recommended that certain actions be taken to reduce the complexity of the simulation. Doing this check for all primitive species will reduce the number of transport equations solved by the simulator, and save significant time on the simulation.

This chapter provides an overview of how to specify combustion the reaction of fuel vapor and oxygen using PyroSim. The former refers to the reaction of fuel vapor and oxygen; the latter the generation of fuel vapor at a solid or liquid surface. In an FDS fire simulation, there is only one gaseous fuel that acts as a surrogate for all the potential fuel sources. A more complex approach is to define a material with a pyrolysis reaction.

The fuel composition is entered on the Fuel tab. Alternately, the user can select the fuel from a predefined species list that is given in the FDS User Guide, Table PyroSim supports the custom smoke features available in FDS.

To create custom smoke, first define an species with the desired mass extinction coefficient. This “smoke” species can then be injected into the domain like any other species. Finally, if the Results should track this species as smoke, go to the Analysis menu, select Simulation Parameters.

Note that in addition to specifying the mass fraction of a species, the mass fraction of any mixture fraction species can also be selected for smoke display, including the mass fraction of oxygen, water vapor, and the other species specified in the gas-phase reaction. PyroSim supports three types of particles: massless tracers, liquid droplets, and solid particles. To create a new particle:. Evaporating liquid droplets can be used with sprinkler spray models and nozzles to customize the spray.

They can also be used in particle clouds and surface types that support particle injection. To specify a liquid droplet, you must specify a species. This can be one of the predefined species recognized in Table If the species is not predefined, it is important to specify the liquid properties of the species.

Drage refers to the drag force the particle exerts on the flow around it, see section ” Liquid particles can be injected into the domain as evaporating fuel vapor that will burn according to the combustion model specified in the active reaction. PyroSim provides basic support for specifying solid particles. A solid particle must reference a surface, from which it derives its thermophysical and geometric parameters.

A solid particle can be used to model various heat transfer, drag, and vegetation applications. Most of the parameters unique to solid particles must be defined on the Advanced Panel, see Chapter Massless tracer particles can be used to track air flow within a simulation.

They can also be used in particle clouds. By default, PyroSim provides a black, massless tracer particle called Tracer. To use a custom tracer particle in your simulation, you can modify the parameters of this default particle to suit your needs, or you can create a new particle. Normally, the insertion of particles into the domain is controlled by the surface or object emitting them, such as by a fan or supply surface or a particle cloud. Alternatively, the insertion of particles can be controlled by a device or other control logic.

For more information on controls, see Chapter There are two global options relating to particles in the Simulation Parameters dialog. The first option, Droplets Disappear at Floor , can be used to prevent droplets from gathering on the floor of the simulation area.

The default value for this option is ON. The second option, Max Particles per Mesh , can be used to set an upper limit on the number of particles allowed in any simulation mesh.

Particle Clouds provide a way to insert particles into the simulation either in a box-shaped region or at a specific point. Particles can either exist at the start of the FDS simulation or can be inserted periodically. To create a particle cloud, on the Model menu, click either New Particle Cloud.

This will show the particle cloud dialog as in Figure The geometry properties, including the size and location of the volume or the point location can be specified on the Geometry tab. Press OK to create the new particle cloud. It will appear as a translucent box or a point in the 3D and 2D Views. Devices are used to record quantities in the model or to represent more complex sensors, such as smoke detectors, sprinklers, and thermocouples.

Devices can be moved, copied, rotated, and scaled using the tools described in Chapter By copying a single device along a line and then copying the line in the normal direction, it is possible to quickly define an array of devices.

When a device is defined, a trigger value setpoint can be created that can be used to activate other objects. This is discussed more in Chapter In addition, the output of a device can be frozen at its current value when another control activates. This can be used to create more complex logic, such as holding the heat release rate of a fire at its current value when a sprinkler activates.

An aspiration detection system groups together a series of soot measurement devices. An aspiration system consists of a sampling pipe network that draws air from a series of locations to a central point where an obscuration measurement is made.

To define such a system in FDS, you must provide the sampling locations, sampling flow rates, the transport time from each sampling location, and if an alarm output is desired, the overall obscuration setpoint. Supply the following information for the aspiration detection system, Figure Simple gas phase and solid phase devices can be used to measure quantities in the gas or solid phase.

To create a thermocouple, on the Devices menu, click New Thermocouple. The output of the thermocouple is the temperature of the thermocouple itself, which is usually close to the gas temperature, but not always, since radiation is included in the calculation of thermocouple temperature. The flow measurement device can be used to measure a flow quantity through an area. The heat release rate device measures the heat release rate within a volume.

There is often the need to estimate the location of the interface between the hot, smoke-laden upper layer and the cooler lower layer in a burning compartment. Relatively simple fire models, often referred to as two-zone models, compute this quantity directly, along with the average temperature of the upper and lower layers.

In a computational fluid dynamics CFD model like FDS, there are not two distinct zones, but rather a continuous profile of temperature. FDS uses an algorithm based on integration along a line to estimate the layer height and the average upper and lower layer temperatures. A beam detector measures the total obscuration between points. A heat detector measures the temperature at a location using a Response Time Index model. To define a heat detector device, on the Devices menu, click New Heat Detector.

A smoke detector measures obscuration at a point with two characteristic fill-in or “lag” times. To define a smoke detector, on the Devices menu, click New Smoke Detector. Nozzles are very much like sprinklers, only they do not activate based on the standard RTI model. They can be set to activate by custom control logic.

Objects can be set to activate or deactivate during the simulation using activation events. Activation events are the control logic system in FDS and can be set on each geometric simulation object e.

PyroSim supports activation events based on time and input devices. Some uses of activation events include:. After selecting an input type and an action, a pattern in sentence form for describing the control logic will appear in the dialog. Some key words and numbers will be drawn in blue and underlined. Any blue text can be clicked to modify the behavior of the specific control. Figure shows the selector popup for objects. Objects are selected by name.

Activation controls are stored separately from specific geometric objects. This makes it possible to bind an object to a control after it has been created. Figure shows the activation control in the object properties dialog for a hole. Once a control has been bound to an object or objects any objects linked to that control will show a text description of the control in their properties editor. This text will be shown in blue and underlined and can be clicked to edit the activation control.

Changes made to the activation control will impact all referencing objects. To create or remove an object at a specific time, select Time for the Input Type in the Activation Controls dialog. When using time as the input, objects can be created at a specific time, removed at a specific time, or be created and removed periodically throughout the simulation.

When performing multiple timed events, the creation and removal and times at which they occur are specified in the table at the bottom of the dialog. The create and remove events should alternate as time increases.

To create or remove some objects based on a device in the model, the device must first have a setpoint enabled. Once the desired devices have been given a setpoint, they can be used as inputs to the control logic expression. If more than one detector is to be used to activate the objects, the descriptive sentence can be used to decide if the objects should trigger when any, all, or a certain number of the devices activate.

A duct is required for any HVAC system. Note that an HVAC Fan is a class of object, and a single fan definition can be used by any number of ducts. A given filter can limit the flow of any number of valid species defined in the model.

Note that an HVAC Filter is a class of object, and a single filter definition can be referenced by any number of nodes. Note that an HVAC Aircoil is a class of object, and a single aircoil definition can be used by any number of ducts. See Section 8. In this chapter we describe the simulation output options available in PyroSim. Each of these options is located in the Output menu.

Solid profiles measure quantities e. This output file contains the data necessary to create an animated 2D chart of the quantity as it extends into the object over time.

PyroSim does not currently support displaying this output file. To generate solid profile output, on the Output menu, click Solid Profiles. This data can then be animated and displayed using the 3D Results Figure To generate animated slice planes, either draw them using the drawing tools as described in Section 9. This data can then be animated and displayed using the 3D Results in several different ways, including volumetric renderings, plotting 2D slices through the data, plotting points, or creating isosurfaces, all in the 3D Results application.

Figure shows a volumetric rendering. To generate animated 3D slices, either draw them using the drawing tools as described in Section 9.

Boundary quantities provide a way to visualize output quantities e. This data can be animated and visualized in the 3D Results Figure Since the data applies to all surfaces in the simulation, no geometric data needs to be specified. To generate boundary quantity data, on the Output menu, click Boundary Quantities. In the Animated Boundary Quantities dialog, you can select each quantity you would like to be available for visualization.

Isosurfaces are used to plot the three dimensional contour of gas phase quantities. To generate isosurface data, on the Output menu, click Isosurfaces , In the Animated Isosurfaces dialog, you can select each quantity you would like to be available for visualization.

Then you must enter values at which to display that quantity in the Contour Values column. If you enter more than one contour value, each value must be separated by the semi-colon character ;. Once you have finished typing the value, press enter. Plot3D is a standard file format and, like 3D slices, can be used to display 2D contours, vector plots, and isosurfaces in a volumetric region the 3D Results Figure Each Q file contains data for up to five quantities. Simulations with multiple meshes have XYZ and Q files for each mesh.

The 3D Results will automatically stitch the individual Q files together to animate the results. To quickly select the quantities useful in Pathfinder, including the FED calculation, click the Reset button and click Pathfinder Quantities.

Statistics output is an extension of the devices system. You can insert a statistics gathering device and it will output data about the minimum, maximum, and average value of a particular quantity in one or more mesh.

This data can then be viewed in a 2D chart using PyroSim Figure To generate statistics data for some region, on the Output menu, click Statistics. Once a quantity is selected, some combination of the following options is available depending on whether the quantity is gas or solid-phase and what units are output by the quantity:. This includes setting up simulation parameters, executing single- and multi-threaded simulations, running a remote cluster simulation, and resuming previously stopped simulations.

Before running a simulation, FDS simulation parameters should be adjusted to fit the problem. This can include parameters such as simulation time, output quantities, environmental parameters, conversion of angled geometry to blocks, and miscellaneous simulator values.

To edit the simulation parameters, on the Analysis menu, select Simulation Parameters. This shows the simulation parameters dialog.

The parameters are split into several categories, with each category on another tab of the dialog. All time-related values can be entered on the Time tab as shown in Figure The Environment tab enables various ambient environmental properties to be set as shown in Figure A unique aspect of this tab is the specification feature for gravity.

Gravity, in each of the X, Y, and Z directions, can be defined as a ramped function. This allows users to model complex behavior of gravity in tunnel or space applications where spatial or temporal variations in direction may change the magnitude vector.

Each ramp can be set to vary as a function of either the position along the X direction, or time. While the Environment tab provides control over ambient environmental conditions, different temperatures, pressures, and mass fractions of species can be specified in various sub-regions of the model by using Init Regions.

This opens the Initial Region dialog as shown in Figure Specify the desired temperature, pressure, or mass fraction of species to override in the region on the General tab and enter the volume parameters on the Geometry tab. Press OK to create the Init Region. Wind parameters can be specified by checking Configure Wind and then clicking the Edit button.

This will open the Wind dialog as shown in Figure The Wind Profile tab provides control over how the wind speed and temperature develops as a function of the elevation. The Custom Profile parameters provide fine-grained control over the initial wind speed, direction, and velocity and temperature as a function of elevation. The Speed Change over Time tab allows control over the wind velocity as a function of time. While the wind profile determines the base speed at various locations and elevations in the model, the speed change over time parameters provide multipliers that are applied to these values to vary them over time.

The Natural Wind tab provides the ability to allow wind to develop naturally by specifying pressure drops over distance. This may be useful for modeling transit tunnels. The Simulator tab provides control over the simulator used in FDS.

The Radiation tab provides control over radiation parameters used in FDS. PyroSim allows obstructions and holes to be drawn that are not aligned with the solution mesh needed by FDS Figure PyroSim will either do this automatically when the FDS input file is generated, or this can be done manually for individual objects by right-clicking the object and selecting Convert to Blocks.

The Angled Geometry tab of the simulation parameters dialog provides default parameters that control conversion of obstructions and holes into blocks for the FDS input file as shown in Figure As of FDS version 6.

OpenMP will automatically be used to utilize multiple processing cores, if available, during the simulation procedure. These settings are applied to the execution context created by PyroSim and do not alter system environment variables. Once you have created a fire model, you can run the simulation from within PyroSim.

FDS actions can be accessed from either the Analysis menu or the main toolbar, as shown in Figure PyroSim will save a copy of the current PyroSim file into this directory and create the following files:. The file preferences control whether the optional files are written, see Section 2. The input files will automatically be named after the PyroSim file. With the default preferences, for the “switchgear” example, the files would be switchgear.

All result files from FDS will also be stored in this directory. This dialog, which shows FDS progress and messages, can be minimized and you can continue using PyroSim and even run additional simulations while a simulation is running. When running a simulation with multiple MPI processes, all of the computation within each of the meshes can take place independently.

For a detailed list of suggestions and information about running FDS in parallel, please consult section 6. This has similar restrictions to running a parallel simulation, in that each grid is run in a separate process. The cluster may be composed of several computers, or nodes, and each node may have any number of processors.

All nodes in the cluster can be entered in the table, along with the number of processes to launch on each node. All input and output files will be stored in the same directory as the specified FDS file. If an FDS simulation has been gracefully stopped by pressing the Stop button in the simulation dialog, it can later be resumed.

SpatiaLite uses the SQLite database engine. They are open source and lightweight with the ability to hold spatial and non-spatial files in a single file container. They also support versioned editing, backups, and recovery of an enterprise database over the same network.

With support for different geometry types, the PostGIS spatial database allows querying and managing information about locations and mapping. ArcSDE serves data in a centralized way over an entire organization using a relational database management system.

End-users can access spatial data in an Esri environment and seamlessly edit and analyze data in an enterprise geodatabase. As point cloud data, LiDAR is a dense network of coordinate points with elevation values. These GIS formats require specialized software or extensions to view or edit. The LAS file format is a binary file format specifically for the interchange between vendors and customers.

The dense networks of coordinate point measurements are so large sometimes that they often need to be split to prevent the file size from becoming too large. You can save significant storage space using the LAZ file format. Like most file compression, LAZ has no information loss. Through LAS datasets, you can visualize triangulated surfaces and perform statistical analysis. The first 3 columns generally represent X, Y and Z coordinates. Non-binary files like XYZ are advantageous because they can be opened and edited in a text editor.

Similar to other CAD design formats, engineers and architects use it for construction design. Elevation file formats are specific to digital elevation model products.

They are widely used in the industry because of the high volume of legacy elevation models produced by the USGS. The DEM format is a single file containing 3 record types.

They are a raster format consisting of terrain elevation values often captured from aircraft radar. User-defined attributes are assigned through TAB files. The 3 levels of resolutions contain various cell-spacing resolution:. These web file formats are built specifically to serve and display geographic features over the internet. Although there are other web-based file formats that store geographic data such as GeoJSON , these file formats are unique to web mapping.

Webfeeds with location have become a tool for disaster notification. Now, RSS have locations. Web feature services allows users to share geospatial or non-spatial over the internet. Thus, feature services can be consumed through the internet in webmaps, desktop and web applications. Temporal data has a time component attached to it. A lot of weather data uses temporal GIS data formats because of how important time is related to weather.

Other examples of temporal data are demographic trends, land use patterns, and lightning strikes. An example of a multi-dimension NetCDF could be temperature, precipitation or wind speed over time. Generally, they all hierarchically store layers and then display them in a layout. ArcGIS uses this file format to store map layers in a table of contents.

Each layer in a data frame references a data source. Map layers are displayed from the map layout in a hierarchical manner. When reopening a MXD, all symbology and labeling are retained since it was last saved. This file type can be opened similar to. TXT or. XLS file. All the map layers and composers are stored in a QGS project file.

It retains the same, labeling, and map layers as they were since last saving. Map layers are referenced pointing to the physical data sources. These files are stored in the same directory as the project file. They can also contain connections to databases, servers and folders. But they are different from MXDs in that projects can have multiple maps and layouts in a single project. They contain common basemaps and page layouts to be reused repeatedly in an organization.

Your ArcGIS profile uses the normal. In order to fix map document issues, you can reset your application through the normal. The purpose of cartographic file formats is to standardize map creation with a set of symbols, labels, or feature displays.

But they contain the symbology to stylize your map features. Layer files are used for displaying a set of symbology in a map. Instead layer files simply specify how the data will be displayed.

When you share a vector or raster data set, a layer file ensures the same symbology will be displayed on another map. You can apply a QML file to any file without needing data. Three-dimensional file formats not only give XY locations of features but also add depth to features. These 3D file formats are graphic representations of objects in the real world developed in 3D modeling software. This reference image file simulates textures in 3D web scenes in Esri and Google Earth.

Generally, they are non-native formats specifically designed for interoperability and data transfer. Esri ArcInfo Interchange files are no longer supported. It has the extension E00 and increases incrementally E01, E02… with individual coverage files. Although convenient for interchange, you need to process the data before you can add it to ArcGIS.

The purpose of generating MPKs is to not only transfer the layers in a table of contents but the physical data that is associated with each layer in a data frame. Once the MPK file is transferred, they have access to editing their own source version of data.

This list of file extensions and formats is specific to indoor mapping , which can be incorporated in building a seamless 2D or 3D for different floor levels inherent in buildings. They are geographic in nature and perform a specific function related to the analysis, management, or display of geographic information.

ECD files classify a raster dataset during the segmentation and classification process. They specify the trained samples of remote sensing raster data sets for supervised classification. From 2D to 3D, three-dimensional file formats add depth.

Then from fixed to dynamic time, multi-temporal formats add the element of time. GIS is truly one of the most diverse and expanding technologies, as shown by the plethora of GIS formats in the industry. Thanks for the great list! What about layer style formats? Like SLD for instance. ADF, however like shapes and filegdb there is more than one file on disk for a single raster.

CPG describe the encoding applied to create the shapefile. Where are MapInfo file formats? Since when is Postgis a file format? Thanks for the overview but I want to correct two points. Your email address will not be published. Skip to content. Some geospatial data formats are common. But some are not so common. First, take a look at these 63 formats in GIS.

Then, bookmark it for future reference:. Subscribe to our newsletter:. I would love it if you added the following file formats:. Thank you! Leave a Reply Your email address will not be published.

Toggle Menu Close. Search for: Search. All commercial and open source accept shapefile as a GIS format. The three required files are: SHP is the feature geometry. SHX is the shape index position. DBF is the attribute data. You can optionally include these files but are not completely necessary.

PRJ is the projection system metadata. XML is the associated metadata. SBN is the spatial index for optimizing queries. SBX optimizes loading times. Similar to shapefiles, they require a set of files to represent geographic information and attributes. ID files are index files that link graphical objects to database information.

MAP files are the map objects that store geographic information. IND files are index files for the tabular data. AUX auxiliary files store projections and other information. OVR pyramid files improves performance for raster display. Whereas Band interleaved by pixel BIP assigns pixel values for each band by rows.

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